Chapter 7 - SHOPPING

SHOPPING - GENERAL

General Approach

7.1 Shopping provision has improved markedly within the Borough from a previously very poor level of provision, and is continuing to do so despite a downturn in market conditions. The rapid expansion of the retail industry during the mid to late 1980s brought an increased demand for shopping floorspace, both within the established town centres and out-of-town and a number of developments have taken place.

7. 2 The Belfry scheme in Redhill town centre, completed in 1993, provides a major indoor shopping facility of some 22,800 sq.m. gross retail floorspace, and brought much needed comparison shopping and multiple stores into the Borough. Food shopping in particular is now well served throughout the Borough, with new or extended supermarkets in Reigate, Redhill and Horley town centres and Banstead Village. A superstore at Burgh Heath, near Banstead, together with another at Hookwood, near Horley, provide the Borough with amongst the best coverage of out-of-town convenience shopping in Surrey.

7. 3 The Borough's local shopping centres have remained relatively buoyant, providing basic convenience goods essential to less mobile sectors of the community and often invaluable for top-up purchase for those whose bulk shopping is done elsewhere.

7. 4 Given the high level of investment already undertaken within the Borough's established centres and continuing programmes of environmental improvements, including the creation of pedestrian priority areas, it is the Borough Council's intention that established town centres and local centres should continue to be the main focus for shopping provision and that their respective roles should be protected and enhanced wherever possible.

Policy Sh 1

The Borough Council will seek to improve shopping provision within Town Centre Shopping Areas and in Local Shopping Centres.

In Town Centre Shopping Areas and Local Shopping Centres, as shown on the Proposals Map, and in small parades, the Borough Council will also encourage environmental improvements including the improvement of public parking facilities and the reduction of conflict between pedestrians and vehicles.

Proposals which result in the loss of existing or proposed retail floorspace will normally be resisted.

Amplification

(1) Where requested by the Borough Council, proposals for new retail floorspace should be supported by evidence demonstrating the impact on the remainder of the centre.
(2) Preference will be given to schemes which meet identified deficiencies and which contribute to the enhancement of the shopping environment. A number of the centres suffer from parking difficulties or lack of parking and have become hazardous to traffic and pedestrians. Park and Ride schemes may also be an appropriate way to provide parking. Amenity features and/or public facilities are also lacking in some of the local centres, and the shopping environment could be greatly improved by provision of additional landscaping, seating, public toilets and facilities for mothers with young children. Public funding for such works may well be limited and although works will be undertaken as and when resources permit, encouragement will be given to development related improvements where appropriate.
(3) Environmental improvement schemes will normally be the subject of development briefs prepared by the Borough Council or in conjunction with the applicants. The Borough Council will normally consult with local organisations on the type and nature of improvements to be undertaken.
(4) The loss of existing or proposed retail floorspace will only be permitted when adequate alternative shopping provision is available within the locality and the existing floorspace does not contribute to satisfying the shopping needs of the Borough. The aim will be to retain a range of retail provision including retail warehousing and garden centres.

Design and Layout

7. 5 Historically the Borough's principal shopping centres have been characterised by buildings of a domestic scale, often narrow fronted and with a variety of eaves heights combining to promote a vertical emphasis within the street scene. This is still the situation within Reigate town centre, Banstead Village and parts of Horley and Redhill town centres. The retention and enhancement of existing character is a continuous theme throughout this Local Plan and proposals will be required to conform to the overall pattern and form of development in each of the centres concerned.

7. 6 Given that the whole of Reigate Town Centre Shopping Area lies within a Conservation Area, the Borough Council will require a sensitive approach to design, incorporating, where applicable, the use of traditional building forms and materials.

7. 7 In other areas which do not exhibit a traditional or historic character, a more modern approach may well be acceptable. Nevertheless, the Borough Council will require developments to contribute to an improvement in the visual quality of the shopping centre.

7. 8 To assist in improving the attractiveness of shopping areas in line with overall environmental improvements being made to town centres, it is considered that a more rigorous design approach to shop fronts and advertisements is required. The appropriate treatment will depend on the individual scale and character of the building, and its relationship to other buildings in the street. Particular care will be necessary where historic buildings are concerned and where the building is in a Conservation Area.

Policy Sh 2

In order to maintain and enhance the natural and built environment of the Borough, all proposals for retail development will normally be required to:

(i) make the best use of the physical characteristics of the site, views into and out of the site and aspect; existing trees, vegetation and other interesting features will be expected to be retained;
(ii) be of the scale and form which would respect the general pattern of development in the area and avoid undue change in building heights;
(iii) comprise a layout and design which does not adversely affect the amenities of adjoining properties;
(iv) integrate, where appropriate, with other shopping elements within the town centre or local centre to facilitate ease of pedestrian movements and enhance shopping activities;
(v) be designed to a high standard incorporating elevational treatments, roofscape and building materials which complement the character of the area;
(vi) include, where appropriate, shop fronts and advertisements (illuminated or not) which are designed to respect the entire elevation of the building of which they form part and to be complementary to the street scene in general;
(vii) incorporate additional hard and/or soft landscaping, where appropriate, which should be considered at an early stage as an integral part of the overall design;
(viii) incorporate facilities for the disabled and for the easy movement of perambulators, pushchairs and wheelchairs;
(ix) provide satisfactory means for the storage and collection of refuse and litter, where appropriate, especially in the case of hot food take-away shops;
(x) where necessary fume extraction equipment should be fitted in as unobtrusive a manner as possible;
(xi) comply with the currently adopted standards for highway design, parking and servicing provision; and
(xii) take into account the requirements of energy conservation.

Amplification

(1) The Borough Council will normally require applications to be supported by a thorough site survey assessing the quality and effect of the proposed development on existing features. The survey should include reference to levels, aspect, views into and out of the site, trees, hedges, shrubs and other landscaping features, and to neighbouring properties. These factors must be taken into account in formulating even preliminary layouts.
(2) Applicants will, where appropriate, be expected to undertake a comprehensive tree survey identifying the location, species and condition of all trees on the site. Trees not only form a natural feature which it is impossible to replace immediately, but also can be used to reduce the visual impact of new development. Developers will be required to observe a strict code of tree protection during the construction period (see Policy Pc 4).
(3) As a general rule, development should not normally exceed the height of other buildings in the surrounding area, in order to avoid overlooking, interference with established views, or having an adverse affect on the character of the area. Where larger retail buildings or complexes are appropriate, the Borough Council will have particular regard to integration with the surrounding area.
(4) To avoid an adverse affect on adjoining properties particular care will need to be taken over the siting of accesses, and unloading and parking areas. Other considerations will include the amelioration of noise, including that from plant, glare from floodlighting and advertisements and noise and disturbance emanating from activity focal points.
(5) Proposals should incorporate adequate facilities for pedestrians and existing or enhanced provision through developments and linking activities outside the development should be made wherever possible.
(6) Development proposed in the Conservation Areas, including Reigate, Merstham and Walton-on-the-Hill, will require particularly sensitive treatment and regard must be given to the use of traditional building forms and use of traditional finishing materials.
(7) Shopfront design and advertisements should provide well proportioned fascias, preferably with signwriting and shop windows, stallrisers and vertical and horizontal framing of windows, all in proportion with the elevation of the building. Particular attention to detail is required in Conservation Areas and in dealing with listed or locally listed buildings where considerable emphasis will be given to the use of traditional materials, proportions and design conventions. Any illuminated signs and shop advertisements, including floodlighting, will form a critical part of the design assessment. The Borough Council has prepared supplementary planning guidance on shop fronts and signs. (2001).
(8) Landscaping means the treatment of land for the purpose of enhancing or protecting the amenities of the site and the area in which it is situated, and includes screening by fence, walls or other means, planting of trees, hedges, shrubs or grass, formation of banks, terraces or other earthworks, and other amenity features. Plans of proposed additional landscaping will be required at the detailed planning application stage so as to assess the quality of the proposed built environment in its finished form.
(9) Shop door widths and lift doors, lift carriages and other doors within retail development, should all be designed to accommodate the needs of the disabled and their helpers and for prams and pushchairs, including double-buggies. For practical guidance on access for the disabled see the Approved Document dealing with the requirements from PART M of Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations 1991.
(10) In situations where fume extraction equipment cannot be positioned unobtrusively, painting in an appropriate colour will be a requirement.
(11) Traffic aspects will be evaluated in relation to any internal road layout meeting approved standards and the effect of the completed development on the existing highway network. Proposals will need to demonstrate that a satisfactory means of access can be provided to approved standards, without causing an increase in danger to road users and pedestrians, and without giving rise to undesirable visual impact upon the street scene, e.g. loss of important trees or hedges. Developers should particularly avoid poor design features, e.g. unsightly views of service courts and refuse facilities, large unrelieved parking areas, etc.

SHOPPING IN TOWN CENTRES

New Provision

7. 9 Redhill's role as the major shopping centre for Eastern Surrey has been consolidated by the completion of The Belfry scheme in 1993, on the former Cromwell Road car park site. Further shopping improvements in Redhill are limited by the extent of modern redevelopment and the barriers to growth created by railways, roads, and the Memorial Park. To ensure Redhill's future competitiveness with neighbouring towns and to continue the improvement of the shopping environment, the South-East Quadrant is identified as the next major shopping redevelopment opportunity within the town.

7. 10 A supermarket, together with 7 shops around the newly created Cage Yard was built in 1993 on land south of Reigate High Street.

7. 11 The main justification for any further retail floorspace expansion in Redhill and Reigate will be, essentially, a qualitative one, both from the standpoint of increasing the range of goods on offer and in helping to secure a viable and vital future for the two town centres.

7. 12 Policies and proposals for Horley Town Centre are included in the Horley Master Plan Chapter 14.

Policy Sh 3

Within the Town Centre Shopping Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, replacement and additional retail floorspace will be provided as part of the following Integrated Mixed Use Schemes;-

(i) land at the South-East Quadrant, Redhill;
(ii) land at the North-West Quadrant, Redhill;
(iii) land at the Central car park, Horley; Deleted (2005)
(iv) land at the north side of High Street, Horley; Completed
(v) land at the former Henry's Garage, Victoria Road, Horley; and
(vi) land at High Street, Banstead. Completed

Development of these sites will be the subject of development briefs prepared by the Borough Council or in conjunction with the applicants, which will incorporate the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2.

Amplification

(1) Initial planning guidelines for each site are set out in the appropriate Inset Area chapter and the Horley Master Plan Chapter. Increases in retail floorspace will not be expected to exceed a level which is broadly in line with estimates of support population and expenditure per head. Evidence of the impact on the remainder of the centre and on adjoining centres will normally be required in support of any planning application.

Supermarket Provision

7. 13 Policy Sh 4 deleted (1994) as site at High Street, Reigate completed.

Other Retail Provision

7. 14 The requirements of retailers are constantly changing in response to consumer preferences and innovations in the retailing industry. The small-scale redevelopment of existing shop units can improve the quality and variety of shopping and services, providing a range of units suitable for modern shopping needs. However, it is also important to ensure that the needs of small businesses displaced by redevelopment are catered for, wherever possible, in new schemes, e.g. specialist repairers and services and second hand and other specialist shops. Preference will be given to schemes which make provision for other small scale activities appropriate to the role of a town centre.

Policy Sh 5

Within Town Centre Shopping Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, the provision of additional Class A1 retail floorspace by way of new development, redevelopment, extension or change of use, will normally be permitted if:-

(i) the proposal is of a size and type appropriate to the shopping centre;
(ii) the proposal would not unduly affect the viability of other shopping both within the shopping centre and in Local Shopping Centres, as shown on the Proposals Map;
(iii) the proposal complements the character of the area and would not have an adverse affect on the environment and amenities of the surrounding area;
(iv) where appropriate, provision is made for existing firms and small scale activities; and
(v) the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2 are met in full.

Amplification

(1) Evidence may be required in support of significant proposals to demonstrate the likely impact on the town centre and surrounding centres.
(2) Environmental and amenity criteria will be used to assess proposals in terms of the siting and scale of the proposed development and amount of floorspace to be provided, the effects on the existing infrastructure, details of access, parking and servicing provision.
(3) Provision for small scale activities could include accommodation for public facilities or community services, leisure/meeting room accommodation, and kiosks for specialist repairers and services.

Open Air Markets

7. 15 The stall markets at Redhill and in Horley have proved very popular with the general public. They also allow smaller businesses to experiment with new retailing opportunities and, if properly organised and controlled, can add colour and variety to a town centre. The established Redhill market, which occupied an unsatisfactory site at Gloucester Road car park, has been relocated by the Borough Council within the pedestrianised area.

Policy Sh 6

The Borough Council will encourage the establishment and maintenance of an open stall market at Redhill, Reigate and Horley on appropriate sites within the Town Centre Shopping Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map.

Amplification

(1) The Borough Council has established a 50-60 demountable stall market, of a high quality, within the pedestrian priority area of High Street and Station Road, Redhill. The market is run by private operators under licence from the Council. Conditions of the licence permit the holding of the market on Thursdays and Saturdays. Servicing is time limited to prevent vehicles entering the pedestrian priority area during principal shopping hours.
(2) The Borough Council has established a temporary open market in the High Street car park, Horley on Saturdays. The market is run by private operators under a licence from the Council and is required to have a maximum of only 50% of stalls selling food. The Borough Council will seek to relocate the market to the pedestrian priority area in High Street, following the completion of Consort Way.
(3) Opportunities to provide a stall market in Reigate town centre will continue to be investigated at a time nearer the implementation of the road improvements and pedestrian priority proposals.
(4) Occasional markets are held in the pedestrianised Tunnel Road, Reigate.

Control of Class A2 and A3* Uses in Redhill and Reigate Town Centres

7. 16 Introduction: Retailing is recognised as one of the most dynamic of all land users. It is constantly evolving and as a result its land use requirements also change. It has been necessary to make alterations to the town centre retail policies to incorporate additional considerations of vitality and viability, alongside the use class frontage based approach in line with PPG6 : Town Centres and Retail Developments (1996). Paragraph three of the policy incorporates consideration of the effects of changes of use on the town’s vitality and viability.

7. 17 To date only Horley Town Centre has been reassessed in terms of its primary and secondary frontages and has consequently been moved from Policy Sh 7 to Policy Sh 8. It is intended to reassess the other centres as part of the ongoing process of producing town centre strategies and monitoring the ‘health’ of all the centres.

7. 18 Purpose: To preserve the Class A1 core retail function of the Town Centres whilst recognizing that an appropriate number and type of Class A2 and A3* uses can have a positive impact on the vitality and viability of a centre.

Policy Sh 7

The loss of Class A1 retail frontage will not be permitted within Primary Shopping areas of Redhill and Reigate Town Centres, as shown on the Proposals Map, unless the proportion of the identified street frontage occupied by Class A1 retail shops is above 80%.

Within the Secondary Shopping Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, the loss of Class A1 retail frontage will not be permitted unless the proportion of the identified street frontage occupied by Class A1 retail shops is above 66%.

If a proposal falls below the relevant threshold it will be assessed against criteria designed to sustain and enhance the vitality and viability of the Centre, including evidence of reasonable attempts at letting as a Class A1 retail shop.

When concentrations of more than two non-Class A1 retail uses, or the equivalent frontage, would arise within either the Primary or Secondary Shopping Areas, the loss of a Class A1 retail shop will not be permitted.

Amplification
(see following Policy Sh 8)

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this Plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.

Control of Class A2 and A3* Uses in Horley Town Centre and Banstead Village Centre

7. 19 Horley Town Centre was previously included within Policy Sh 7 and was separated into primary and secondary frontages. Having reassessed the town centre frontages and having regard to the impact of the relocation of the Waitrose supermarket there does not appear to be a clear demarcation between the primary and secondary shopping areas, a new threshold has been set requiring a minimum level of 70% A1 retail uses in frontages throughout the centre.

7. 20 Banstead Village centre is of local significance and as a single centre does not lend itself to sub-division into primary and secondary areas. Although comparison shopping does not feature to the extent that it does in Redhill and Reigate, it is important to retain its attraction as a place to shop which enhances the chances of linked trips and reducing the need to travel. Therefore it is considered appropriate to ensure a dispersal of Class A2 and A3* uses throughout the High Street, and to restrict the overall number of such uses.

7. 21 Banstead Village centre has no Secondary Shopping Area a lower percentage of Class A1 retail shops operating throughout the Primary Shopping Area is considered to be more appropriate. In this case 75% should enable a balance to be preserved between protecting Class A1 uses and providing for service uses.

7. 22 Purpose: To preserve the A1 core retail function of the Town Centres whilst recognizing that an appropriate number and type of A2 and A3* uses can have a positive impact on the vitality and viability of a centre.

Policy Sh 8

The loss of Class A1 retail frontage will not be permitted within the Primary Shopping areas of Banstead Village and Horley Town Centre, as shown on the Proposals Map, unless the proportion of the identified street frontage occupied by Class A1 retail shops is above 75% and 70% respectively.

If a proposal falls below the relevant threshold it will be assessed against criteria designed to sustain and enhance the vitality and viability of the Centre, including evidence of reasonable attempts at letting as a Class A1 retail shop.

When concentrations of more than two non-Class A1 retail uses, or the equivalent frontage, would arise the loss of a Class A1 retail shop will not be permitted.

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this Plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.

Amplification to Policies Sh 7 and Sh 8:

(1) The Borough Council will have regard to the effect on the vitality and viability of a particular frontage and the Town or Village Centre as a whole. This will include the effect on: the variety of retail uses available within the centre, the character and attractiveness of the frontage and centre, the number of visitors and length of the working day, other benefits or possible planning gain and compliance with the emerging Town Centre Strategies. Further detail is contained within the Supplementary Planning Guidance on Retail Changes of Use within Town Centres.
(2) Policies Sh 7 and Sh 8 apply to changes of use at ground floor level only.
(3) The shopping areas of each of the town centres are divided into frontage blocks and these are shown on the Proposals Map and within the Town Centre Monitors published by the Borough Council. Applications will be assessed on the basis of the appropriate percentage within each separately lettered frontage block and, additionally, on the basis of the level of concentration. Actual frontage lengths, in metres, are shown on the maps in the monitors and these should be used to calculate the relevant percentage. Only elevations, including returns, with shop windows are included in these figures, which were measured on site.
(4) The operation of this policy will be subject to regular monitoring.
(5) Where retail developments create new frontages, the appropriate percentage for the purposes of assessment will normally be that pertaining to the existing shopping street in which the development takes place.
(6) The types of service uses permissible within the Town Centre Shopping Areas will normally be limited to Class A2 and A3* uses, where the services are provided principally for visiting members of the public.
(7) Evidence of reasonable attempts to let a Class A1 retail shop should include dated extracts from specialist property or local publications indicating how and over what period of time the shop has been advertised. It is central to the proper consideration of proposals under this policy that the shop is advertised both at a price appropriate to the location and in a condition commensurate with its use as a Class A1 retail shop. The Borough Council may seek specialist advice on these matters.
(8) When considering proposals for change of use to a non-Class A1 use, the Borough Council will seek the views of the relevant Chamber of Commerce/Traders’ Organisation.
(9) Applications for change of use which interrupt Class A1 frontage may depend upon the provision of a shop window display.
(10) “Equivalent frontage” is normally assessed as two standard shop front widths, i.e. 10-12 metres.

Control of Sale of Food and Drink Uses

7. 23 Use Class A3* for the sale of food or drink for consumption on the premises or of hot food for consumption off the premises covers restaurants, cafés, snack bars, wine bars and public houses, and hot food take-aways. The nature of the service they provide can generate similar environmental problems which result in disturbance to amenity from noise, smell, litter, etc. and also problems relating to highway safety.

7. 24 The fast food sector of the retailing industry is expanding rapidly and the major operators normally seek locations in central shopping areas in order to maximise customer throughput. Normally, amenity problems are less serious in town centre locations, where the overall incidence of noise and other disturbance is relatively high. However, the rapid throughput of customers associated with fast-food outlets, usually generates on-street parking of a short term nature, which may be hazardous to the flow of traffic and the safety of pedestrians. This can also cause disturbance to residents, particularly at unsocial hours.

Policy Sh 9

The Borough Council will normally permit proposals for change of use, or development of, sale of food and drink uses, including hot-food take-away shops, within the Primary and Secondary Shopping Areas of Redhill and Reigate and within Banstead Village and Horley Primary Shopping Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, if:-

(i) the proposal accords with the provisions of Policies Sh 7 and Sh 8;
(ii) the proposal would not detract from residential amenity by reason of noise, smell, litter and general disturbance;
(iii) customer parking would not inhibit the free flow of traffic and would not be dangerous to pedestrians; and
(iv) proposals meet the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2 in full.

Amplification

(1) Operators will be required to maintain a clean and litter free environment in front of their premises and the Borough Council may require an agreement to this effect.
(2) The hours of opening (including the collection and delivery of goods and materials) may be restricted by planning conditions, particularly where the premises are close to residential properties.

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this Plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.

LOCAL SHOPPING

New Retail Provision

7. 25 It is not expected that there will be any significant demand for additional local shopping development to serve the needs of the existing population. However, the Borough Council will look favourably upon proposals for the upgrading of existing local shopping centres or for new shopping facilities to serve large residential schemes, unless already provided for nearby. Preference will be given to schemes which contribute in other ways to the role of local shopping centres by providing public car parking or other community facilities appropriate to the local centre.

Policy Sh 10

Within Local Shopping Centres, as shown on the Proposals Map, proposals for development, redevelopment, extension or change of use for Class A1 retail use will normally be permitted, if:-

(i) the scale and type of retail use is appropriate to the local shopping centre concerned;
(ii) the proposal would not have an adverse impact on town centre and local shopping in the surrounding area;
(iii) the proposal complements the character of the area and would not have an adverse affect on the environment and amenities of the surrounding area, particularly including local traffic conditions; and
(iv) the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2 are met in full.

Amplification

(1) Evidence may be required in support of significant proposals to demonstrate the likely impact on other centres in the surrounding area.
(2) Environmental and amenity criteria will be used to assess proposals in terms of the siting and scale of the proposed development and amount of floorspace to be provided, the effects on the existing infrastructure, details of access, parking and servicing provision.
(3) Provision of ancillary parking and community facilities will normally be welcomed, but should be of a type and scale appropriate to the local shopping centre concerned.

Proposals involving the loss of Local Shopping

7. 26 As stated in Policy Sh 1, it is the intention of this Local Plan to protect, and where possible enhance, Local Shopping Centres. However, the Borough Council recognises that it is unable to prevent shop closures, which occur relatively frequently in an industry prone to fluctuating market conditions. In order to protect local shopping for those sections of the community who are dependent on such facilities, and so as not to provide incentives for the undue closing of shops, the Borough Council will take a particularly critical view of applications for a change of use which results in the loss of Class A1 retail shop, and will need to be convinced that another Class A1 retail shop is unlikely to be forthcoming.

7. 27 Where changes of use are acceptable, then alternative uses will need to be complementary to the functioning of the Local Shopping Centre or small parade, and will not be permitted where they would adversely affect the vitality and viability of that centre or parade. Both Class A2 and A3* uses already occur in some centres and in limited numbers may complement the attraction of a particular centre. In certain locations residential use may be preferred. However, Class B1 business use will be resisted as being in conflict with Policy Em 1 of this Local Plan and likely to lead to an incremental undermining of the local shopping function.

Policy Sh 11

Class A1 retail floorspace within Local Shopping Centres, or isolated Class A1 retail shops or those within small parades, should normally be retained unless:

(i) the applicant can provide evidence that reasonable attempts have been made, without success, to let it for a Class A1 retail use;
(ii) alternative shopping provision is available within the locality;
(iii) the proposed use would not adversely affect the viability and vitality of the Local Shopping Centre or small parade of shops in which it is situated;
(iv) the proposal complements the character of the area and would not have an adverse affect on the environment and amenities of the surrounding area;
(v) the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2 are met in full.

Proposals which involve a change of use from Class A1, A2 or A3* uses to Class B1 business use will not normally be permitted.

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this Plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.
Subject to the foregoing policy, if an existing shop is located within or adjacent to a predominantly residential area, a change of use to residential will normally be permitted.

Amplification

(1) Evidence of reasonable attempts to let a Class A1 retail shop should include dated extracts from specialist property or local publications indicating how and over what period of time the shop has been advertised. It is central to the proper consideration of proposals under this Policy that the shop is advertised both at a price appropriate to the location and in a condition commensurate with its use as a Class A1 retail shop. The Borough Council may seek specialist advice on these matters. "Locality" of a shop extends to a reasonable walking distance.
(2) Environmental and amenity criteria will be used to assess proposals in terms of the level and type of activity proposed, the effects on the existing infrastructure, details of access, parking and servicing provision.
(3) Subject to Policy Sh 12, Class A3* uses may be considered to have the least detrimental affect on the viability of a local shopping centre or parade. Other possible uses which may be complementary to a local shopping centre include, doctors surgery, dentist, clinic, veterinary surgery, library and small meeting hall/rooms. However, the acceptability of such uses will be dependent upon individual locational circumstances including relationship with surrounding land uses, parking, access and local traffic conditions. The loss of convenience shops will be rigorously assessed under Criterion (ii) of the Policy.
(4) Isolated shops, those detached within their own curtilage or shops at the outer edge of a local shopping centre or small parade are most likely to be appropriate for a change of use to residential.
(5) When considering proposals for change of use to a non-Class A1 use, the Borough Council will seek the views of the relevant Chamber of Commerce/Traders' Organisation.
(6) Applications for change of use which interrupt retail frontage may depend upon providing a suitable shop window display.

Control of sale of food and drink uses

7. 28 Outside town centres the problems of disturbance to residential amenity associated with all Class A3* uses, including take-away outlets, can become more acute and as a result it is often difficult to locate such uses satisfactorily. In addition, the Borough Council is concerned that essential local convenience shopping facilities should be protected in such centres, whilst recognising that food and drink uses, including hot food take-aways do provide a relevant service within Local Shopping Centres.

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this Plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.

Policy Sh 12

The Borough Council will normally resist proposals for change of use to, or development of, sale of food and drink uses including hot-food take-away shops within the Local Shopping Centres, as shown on the Proposals Map, within small shopping parades or involving isolated shops, if:-

(i) the proposal does not comply with Policy Sh 11;
(ii) the proposal involves the loss of local convenience shops;
(iii) the proposal would detract from residential amenity by reason of noise, smell, litter and general disturbance; and
(iv) customer parking would inhibit the free flow of traffic and/or would be dangerous to pedestrians.

Exceptionally, where changes of use are permitted, proposals will be required to meet the appropriate design criteria as set out in Policy Sh 2 in full.

Amplification

(1) Local convenience shops include grocer, chemist, baker, butcher, greengrocer, newsagent, sub-post office and launderette.
(2) Where proposals are permitted the hours of opening (including the collection and delivery of goods and materials) will normally be restricted to 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. on weekdays with no working or activities on Sundays or Public Holidays.

Improvements to Local Shopping Centres

7. 29 Policy Sh 13 deleted (1994) and incorporated within Policy Sh 1.

RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE TOWN CENTRES

Retail Development outside Town Centres

7. 30 Introduction: This Policy combines three 1994 policies that were concerned with different types of retail development outside Town Centres (superstores, major out of centre, retail warehouses and Garden Centres) Separate policies apply to Local Shopping Centres and isolated shops. The criteria within the Policy apply equally to the consideration of proposals for comparison shopping, convenience shopping or retail warehousing uses. The Policy criteria are in line with latest government guidance contained within PPG 6 (1996).

7. 31 The Borough Council, in conjunction with the County Council carried out retail surveys in 1999 (Shops & Services in Surrey’s Town Centres, published October 2001), which provided an assessment of the existing situation. The Borough is served by modern supermarkets in Reigate, Redhill and Horley town centres and in Banstead Village. Superstores at Burgh Heath, near Banstead, and at Hookwood (in Mole Valley District), near Horley, also provide the Borough with substantial out-of-town shopping facilities.

7. 32 Comparison shopping floorspace is concentrated within the Borough’s three Town Centres, Banstead Village and to a lesser extent the 18 Local Shopping Centres. It is the intention of both the Structure Plan and the Borough Local Plan to direct future comparison retailing into appropriate sized centres to sustain the existing retail hierarchy and to promote vital and viable town centres in line with PPG 6 and PPG 13.Additional facilities not in town centres are likely to have an adverse affect on the existing town centres and out of town facilities are also likely to infringe either green belt or countryside policies.

7. 33 There are two allocated sites for retail warehouses in the Borough i.e. the free standing unit on Rushworth Road, Reigate, and the site to the east of Brighton Road, Redhill, comprising three units with potential for expansion within the allocated area.

7. 34 Purpose: To sustain and enhance the vitality and viability of the retail function of the town and local centres, by directing future investment of an appropriate scale to those existing centres where an identified need exists.

Policy Sh 14

With the exception of proposals within the Retail Warehousing Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, further retail development outside Town Centres including extensions to or other improvements at existing premises will be permitted where:

(i) there is a need for the development;
(ii) it has been demonstrated that there are no suitable alternative sites available in a town centre or on the edge of a town centre;
(iii) the proposal individually or cumulatively with other existing and permitted retail development would not adversely affect the vitality and viability of any nearby town centre or local centre;
(iv) the site is accessible by a choice of means of transport and would help achieve the reduction in the number and length of car journeys;
(v) it would not have an unacceptable environmental impact; and
(vi) the appropriate design criteria set out in Policy Sh 2 are met in full.

An applicant may be required to provide evidence of the sequential approach to site selection, a traffic study and a retail impact assessment to assist in the assessment of the proposal.

Where appropriate the range and type of goods sold may be limited by means of a condition or legal agreement.

Proposals for retail warehousing development, redevelopment or extensions in the Retail Warehousing Areas, as shown on the Proposals Map, will be permitted, provided the design criteria set out in Policy Sh 2 are met in full.

Amplification

(1) Retail development for the purpose of this Policy includes comparison goods shopping, convenience goods shopping, Retail Warehouses and Garden centres. Separate policies apply to Local Shopping Centres, small parades and isolated shops (Policies Sh 10 and Sh 11).
(2) For all retail proposals outside Town Centres the onus will be on the applicant to demonstrate a quantitative need for the particular type of retail provision proposed. The appropriate catchment area will depend on the nature of the proposal.
(3) Improvements at existing premises, including to the range of goods available and increases in sales floorspace, will be assessed against this policy, where they require permission.
(4) For all retail proposals outside Town Centres the onus will be on the applicant to demonstrate a quantitative need for the particular type of retail provision proposed. The appropriate catchment area will depend on the nature of the proposal.
(5) In assessing the likely impact upon the vitality and viability of existing centres the Borough Council will consider the likely effect on future investment, changes to the quality and character, physical condition, range of services, vacancy rates and the general attractiveness of the centre to investors, retailers and customers. Such an assessment will take a long term view.
(6) All new retail development should be accessible by a choice of means of transport so that a significant proportion of customers and staff will be able to get to the development by means other than the car. The aim of reducing the need to travel by car is also supported by facilitating linked trips involving more than one service or activity ie. Retail, leisure and community service. This is best achieved within the existing centres.
(7) The sequential approach to site selection for new retail development involves a preference for town centre sites followed by edge of centre, district centres and local centres. Only when sites do not exist in these locations would out of centre sites be considered and only then if they were accessible by a choice of public transport and a need has been demonstrated. For details of the terminology used for retail development see Annex A of PPG 6 (1996).
(8) In addressing the sequential approach the applicant must demonstrate flexibility in format, scale, design and parking provision, and examine not only potential sites within the nearest town centre, but also others nearby that may be outside the Borough. In some cases local shopping centres should also be assessed. Any format driven reasons for requiring development outside town centres will be resisted.
(9) Retail impact assessments should be provided for all retail developments over 2500 square metres gross floorspace. Similar supporting information may be necessary for smaller proposals depending on the relative size and nature of the development in relation to the centre.

Major Out-of-Centre retail developments

7. 35 Policy Sh 15 deleted (2005) and incorporated within Policy Sh 14

Retail Warehouses and Garden Centres

7. 36 Policy Sh 16 deleted (2005) and incorporated within Policy Sh 14.

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