Chapter 14 - HORLEY MASTER PLAN

HORLEY INTRODUCTION

Context

14.1 The following policies seek to give substance to the Horley Master Plan within the strictures of a formal Local Plan document. The Master Plan has been prepared in a complete and comprehensive way following extensive research and technical studies including detailed analysis of the floodplain by the Environment Agency. These form the foundations of the Plan.

Co-ordinated Approach

14.2 In preparing the Horley Master Plan the Borough Council has sought to involve all “stakeholders” in the process on the basis of a partnership, so that the Borough Council has a clearer understanding of the concerns and hopes of all stakeholders and so that all can feel that they have made an effective contribution to the Plan-making process.

14.3 The Borough Council has worked closely with a wide range of local service providers. This includes Surrey County Council departments, the Environment Agency and the private utility companies. This has been a detailed and iterative process based on technical studies, testing of different options and by seeking a co-ordinated approach. Discussions have also been held with the Government Office for the South East (GOSE) and other government departments.

14. 4 The Borough Council also held discussions with the major house builders who already have development options with larger landowners at Horley. The Borough Council has tried to understand the way the development process will work following adoption of the Plan and to explore the potential to secure the best quality of development and accompanying infrastructure for Horley. The intention was to be realistic and not to raise local expectations unnecessarily. Therefore, considerable work has been undertaken to ensure that the necessary infrastructure, social and recreation facilities can be secured.

Comprehensive Approach

14.5 At the very outset the Borough Council decided that the Horley Master Plan was not going to be simply identifying potential new housing areas. The Plan had to be comprehensive and plan for the future of a community for the long term.

14. 6 Sustainable development in its widest sense involves consideration of the physical environment, social cohesion and economic prosperity of an area. The Plan-making process has involved an analysis and appraisal of these three components. Consideration has been given to the interaction between these components and the Council has tried to ensure that preference, or greater weight, has not been given to one to the detriment of the other two. For example new neighbourhoods, it believes, are built as much on quality design and a sense of place (physical environment) as good local community facilities (social cohesion) and integration with good movement corridors to support ease of journeys to work (economic development).

Objectives

14. 7 The Plan aims to secure a high quality of new development, which will also bring benefits to Horley as a whole. The development is planned in a co-ordinated way, complete with the necessary roads, schools and community facilities. When the Borough Council embarked on preparing the Plan it set down six objectives. This was expanded to nine following feedback from the community.

Objective 1: Sustainability
To ensure that the development respects the principles of sustainable development.

14.8 The proposed development is based on two new neighbourhoods placed alongside rather than separate from the existing urban area of Horley. There is also a contribution made to the overall number of new dwellings from smaller sites within the urban area. The philosophy behind the new neighbourhoods is that they would make up sufficient critical mass to be able to justify and support a range of local facilities and services vital to meet everyday needs including public transport. This, in turn, would provide the foundations for two sustainable local communities. The intention is that the new housing and associated infrastructure would also bring some benefits to the adjacent existing communities.

14. 9 The chosen strategy is based on an appraisal of a wide range of criteria, which included agricultural land quality. Some of the land allocated for housing is defined as agricultural land in grade 3a. The Borough Council has not lightly identified this versatile agricultural land. It has only done so after identifying opportunities within the urban area of Horley and assessing alternative strategies, which would have made greater use of poorer agricultural land. Such strategies, however, are considered to be less effective, as a whole, in meeting the Plan’s objectives.

Objective 2: Planning
To plan on a comprehensive basis for the phased development of 2600 dwellings

14. 10 The Plan includes policies which seek to ensure that the developers of all the new houses make a fair and realistic contribution to the facilities, services and infrastructure required as a result of their development. Care has also been taken to ensure that not only are the new houses built in an orderly fashion over a 10 year period but also that the relevant infrastructure is in place, as and when it is needed by the occupants of the new houses.

Objective 3: Housing
To provide for mixed communities, through a range of dwelling types and sizes, including affordable housing, in a sustainable way.

14. 11 The need for 2600 new houses arises from a growth in Surrey’s own households identified in Regional Planning Guidance and the Surrey Structure Plan. The Borough Council’s own housing needs survey has identified the variety of local needs, especially for those whose income is such that they are unable to buy or rent on the open market. Therefore, there are policies in the Plan to ensure that a range of housing is provided to help the neighbourhoods develop into sustainable mixed communities.

Objective 4: Urban and Landscape Design
To promote a high quality, attractive and safe environment, making best use of existing features.

14.12 The Borough Council has sought to explain its strong design philosophy in the Horley Design Supplementary Planning Document. The intention is to prevent the construction of bland, characterless new housing estates, which could be anywhere in the country. The Plan is to design the new neighbourhoods as places of quality and identity, where people will want to stay and put down roots. Care has been taken to identify what is local and distinctive in and around Horley so that these features can be designed into the layout, landscaping and building design of the new neighbourhoods and allocated housing sites. (See also Objective 7: Recreation and Leisure)

14. 13 New developments should be designed to minimise the impact on the environment and should aim to enhance the environment and biodiversity. Development can provide the opportunity to remedy contamination and incorporate environmental design features such as sustainable drainage systems, nature conservation and enhancement, at source recycling facilities and design for solar gain.

Objective 5: Movement
To reduce the need to travel, promote sustainable alternatives to the private car and secure environmental improvements.

14. 14 The Plan is not anti-car, but has been planned around the aim of achieving a 20% reduction in normal peak hour traffic movements from the new housing development. This is to seek to minimise the impact of the developments on traffic congestion at major junctions in Horley. The whole strategy of two new neighbourhoods with a sufficient critical mass to support local facilities, such as schools, shops, community hall, etc., means that there is an opportunity for many local trips to be made within the neighbourhoods safely on foot or by bike. The Plan also contains proposals for part of the new sub-regional high quality public transport (bus) system known as “Fastway”, which connects Crawley, Gatwick, Horley railway station, Horley town centre and the new neighbourhoods.

Objective 6: Town Centre
To improve the vitality and viability of Horley Town Centre.

14. 15 A new comprehensive revitalisation strategy was prepared in 1999 (Horley Town Centre Study) to provide a vision for the re-invigoration of the Town Centre. The role of the town centre as a shopping and community centre is reinforced in the Plan and new residential development that is close and accessible to the town centre will be encouraged. Accessibility to the town centre is improved and clear proposals are set out for the redevelopment of a number of sites for residential and commercial uses. The proposal is that the town centre will develop further as a result of the new housing development in Horley and the additional customers who will live there. As explained below, a number of services will be improved within the town centre in order to meet the needs of the whole population of Horley.

Objective 7: Recreation and Leisure
To ensure a diverse range of recreation and leisure needs are accommodated.

14. 16 The Plan requires that the new development meets the full National Playing Fields Association standards for the provision of outdoor playing space, with some facilities provided locally and others centrally for more organised activities. New facilities proposed include a new leisure centre on the west side of the Town, probably later in the plan period when funding is secured, and a Town Park on land to the south of Smallfield Road. In preparing the Plan, consideration has been also given to the maintenance and enhancement of the natural environment and the opportunities this can provide for informal recreation. As a result, a number of specific proposals are made, especially outside the development sites, for local nature reserves and a riverside green chain.

Objective 8: Community
To promote a healthy and vibrant community in Horley served by a wide range of social infrastructure.

14. 17 Care has been taken to consider the needs of the occupants of the new houses in discussion with service providers and others. Consideration has also been given to the best location for such social infrastructure. Some has been located at the heart of the two new neighbourhoods. However, other facilities and community needs are best provided on a town-wide basis. For many of this latter group the opportunity has been taken to enhance the role of Horley Town Centre and the accessibility to it.

Objective 9: Infrastructure
To secure the orderly provision of infrastructure, and to do so in an environmentally friendly way.

14.18 Negotiations are advanced in securing commitments to the provision of, or contributions towards, a range of infrastructure and community facilities. However, care has been taken to work within national planning policy guidance and to ensure that the infrastructure requirements are reasonable and directly related to the development. The proposals for new infrastructure related to the new NE and NW neighbourhoods will be subject to a full environmental assessment, if appropriate.

14. 19 The Strategy for the Horley Master Plan can be summarised in the following ten points:

1. Development is focused on two new neighbourhoods, which are integral with the existing urban area.

2. These have a critical mass to support community infrastructure and facilities such as new primary schools, local shops, neighbourhood centres and open space.

3.Transportation measures include access roads, junction improvements, a high quality and frequent bus service and good cycle and footpath networks. (To secure a projected 20% modal shift of peak hour traffic from the housing sites onto alternative modes).

4. The two new neighbourhoods are located adjacent to the existing urban areas of Horley so that these adjacent areas can also benefit from the new infrastructure and facilities.

5. Ringing the new neighbourhoods is a riverside green chain of public open space and nature conservation value.

6. Major new facilities of a leisure centre located on the west side of the Town and a town park located on the east side of the town.

7. Horley town centre is re-invigorated with a new strong vision, which includes improving access to the town centre and making this the focus of commercial and retail activities together with additional residential accommodation.

8. The Borough is promoting a strong design philosophy to ensure high quality design and layout in the new housing areas drawing on the special characteristics and features of the local area including natural features (local distinctiveness). Environmental objectives should be achieved by incorporating best practice environmental design (see objective 4).

9. Opportunities are provided for residents to work locally and to travel to work to Gatwick, Crawley or via the railway station by modes other than the car.

10. The Strategy is realistic and achievable and is to be secured by the Borough Council seeking legal commitments from developers to provide or contribute towards the infrastructure and facilities before planning permission is granted.

Conclusion

14. 20 The Borough Council has sought to achieve the best for Horley by preparing a comprehensive and co-ordinated strategy, which takes full account of the local environment and other constraints. It has listened to the concerns and hopes of the local community expressed in their responses during the preparation of the Plan, and it has sought to address these. The strategy seeks to follow Government guidance and best practice in relation to the principles of sustainable development. As explained above, the aim is to plan for new communities providing for many of their needs locally rather than simply to identify new housing sites.

HORLEY GENERAL POLICIES

General Policy on Comprehensive Approach

14.21 Introduction: The Surrey Structure Plan 1994, in identifying Horley as an area in Surrey where provision should be made for 2600 dwellings, also stated that such development should be subject to the requirements of a comprehensive plan for Horley prepared through a review of the Borough Local Plan. The reason for a comprehensive approach is because of the importance of assessing the cumulative impact of a series of individual developments upon Horley.

14.22 Considerable work has been undertaken by Surrey County Council to respond to Government guidance concerning setting road traffic reduction targets and the part land use planning has to play. 2,600 houses in Horley would typically generate in the region of 1,700 vehicle trips in the morning peak. A policy driven target approach of a 20% reduction, based on an analysis of suitable household trip rates, could result in 350 fewer trips. This is substantially accommodated by the active provision of alternatives to the private car and local facilities in close proximity to the housing. This target is included within Surrey County Council’s Local Transport Plan.

14. 23 Purpose: To ensure that housing development on the allocated sites is not piecemeal and to ensure that there is co-ordination between the housing development and infrastructure and community services. To establish the basis for the detailed transportation policies. Therefore, active proposals for meeting the transportation requirements of the housing developments will be expected to be consistent with the aim of securing the target of a 20% reduction in peak hour traffic. This is by comparison with the amount of traffic that would otherwise have been generated by the developments without such proposals.

Policy Hr 1

Housing development in Horley will only be permitted as part of a comprehensive and co-ordinated strategy for the provision of infrastructure and community facilities which seeks to secure a projected 20% modal shift of peak hour traffic onto alternative modes as measured against what it would be without such measures.

Planning applications in respect of each site must be accompanied, as appropriate, by comprehensive and co-ordinated transportation networks and the appropriate location of community facilities.

Amplification

(1) The area of Horley for the purposes of this Chapter is coincident with the Central Horley, Horley East and Horley West Wards.
(2) The policies in the Plan should be read as a whole because together they make up a comprehensive and co-ordinated strategy.
(3) The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.
(4) It has been accepted by the Borough Council, the County Council and by Government that the anticipated future demand for travel by car cannot be met in full. It is therefore necessary to manage the demand so that it can be satisfied at an acceptable environmental and financial cost. This can only be achieved with a major modal shift away from the private car to alternative forms of travel. Consequently, areas of new development should include pedestrian, cycle and public transport facilities, provided by the developer in addition to any new highway infrastructure required on-site or off-site, in order to meet the travel needs generated by the development.
(5) The timing of the provision of the transportation networks in relation to each phase of housing construction will be agreed in the context of the Framework Plans required by Policy Hr 2B.

Local Flooding and Transportation Models

14.24 Introduction: The Horley Master Plan has been based on a number of technical studies including on flooding and transportation. The Borough Council has employed independent consultants to audit the flooding and transportation studies carried out by the Environment Agency and County Council, respectively. The Consultants concluded that the studies are sufficiently robust for making the housing allocations. However, it will be important that further detailed work is carried out to model both flooding and transportation in the areas local to the proposed developments. This work will need to be undertaken by the developers as an integral part of their Framework Plans. Developers should consult the Environment Agency with regard to flood modelling work.

14. 25 Purpose: To ensure that there is detailed modelling of both flooding and transportation.

Policy Hr 2A

The Framework Plans must be based on suitable models of both flooding and transportation. A similar modelling requirement will apply to other allocated or unidentified housing sites for about 50 units or more.

Amplification

(1) The Environment Agency has provided an indicative 1 in 100 year flood event as a wide area model (Horley Flood Study 2004). The developers should prepare a suitable local flooding model, which will determine the extent of the 1 in 100 year flood plain based on the criteria set out in the Flood Risk Development Brief for Horley, prepared by the Environment Agency, Thames Water Utilities Limited and the Borough Council (included in the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document). The model should include a detailed assessment of flooding from main rivers, ordinary watercourses, sewers and surface water run-off. The brief also requires the assessment of the existing sewerage systems and an action plan to ensure continued satisfactory performance of existing sewer networks that might be affected by development. The developers should also demonstrate that their new developments will not increase the risk of flooding at the site or elsewhere. The robustness of the model should be checked and verified by sensitivity analysis.
(2) The developers should prepare a suitable transportation model, which will include an assessment of local traffic impacts at particular locations, assess delays and capacities within the network and measures how effective are any network improvements. The robustness of the model should be checked by sensitivity analysis.

Quality and Sustainable Development

14.26 Introduction: The Horley Master Plan has been based on a strong design philosophy and seeks to follow best practice on sustainable development. To this end the Borough Council has prepared the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document. The allocations and policies in the Plan can only take these principles so far and it will be important that developers and their architects take these principles forward into their Framework Plans and detailed design and layout of the new residential neighbourhoods and other sites.

14. 27 Purpose: To ensure that the development is built of high quality and best sustainable development principles through compliance with the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document.

Policy Hr 2B

In order to secure high quality development only those proposals that have regard to the following criteria (or as otherwise agreed in the preparation of Framework Plans) will be permitted-:

(i) new development should reflect the visual qualities which characterise historic traditional settlements in the area;
(ii) ‘standardised’ layouts which incorporate a high proportion of cul-de-sac development heavily dependent on car usage are not used;
(iii) design elements and materials are used in a homogeneous way;
(iv) arbitrary changes within the street scene are avoided;
(v) a form of development is produced where the car is subservient to the pedestrian and where traffic speed is controlled by design rather than regulation;
(vi) good accessibility is secured to local facilities and to a new high quality bus service;
(vii) new development minimises its adverse impact on the environment; and
(viii) high standards of safety are achieved.

Development of the NW and NE Sectors will only be permitted following consideration of Framework Plans which demonstrate how their developments meet the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document and Local Plan requirements.

Amplification

(1) The Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document includes guidance on meeting the criteria in the Policy. It includes advice on form and layout, a building design code, sustainable surface water drainage, water and energy consumption, transport provision, and the historic and natural environments. It applies to all development in the Horley Central, Horley East and Horley West Wards.
(2) The developers will be expected to prepare Framework Plans to accompany any planning application although it will be an advantage if these are agreed in advance. They should indicate the intended general road layout and pedestrian and cycle routes, the bus routes and any priority measures, traffic management measures, the broad layout of the neighbourhood centres, the nature, density and phasing of the housing; the treatment of the edges of the site where it abuts both existing development and the countryside; and the general location of the larger play spaces.
(3) Developers will be expected to do more than build housing estates but to become involved in developing healthy attractive local communities.
(4) The drive to promote quality in housing layouts is recognised in a number of national publications. The maintenance of biodiversity should be recognised as a measure of sustainability and its promotion should be encouraged in the development of new neighbourhoods.
(5) Development will only be permitted which follows best practice on sustainable development. This should be demonstrated by indicating how it minimises its impact on the environment, develops social cohesion and contributes to economic prosperity.
(6) Sustainable development is now recognised as being much more than minimising the impact of development on the environment, although that is important. It also includes the dimensions of social cohesion and economic prosperity. All three dimensions are interlinked, for example, attractive safe routes to the local primary school can encourage parents to walk with their children to school, thereby reducing the number of cars on the road with the attendant reduction in air pollution. Walking helps parents and children keep fit, and walking increases the opportunity for social interaction between neighbours. Such trips are likely to be combined with shopping in the neighbourhood centre increasing the economic viability of such local shops.

Infrastructure Contributions

14.28 Introduction: Policy Hr 1 states that development will only be permitted as part of a comprehensive and co-ordinated strategy. This land use strategy identifies the housing allocations and the infrastructure and facilities necessary to ameliorate the impacts caused by such development and to ensure that it integrates well with the existing urban area. Without such infrastructure and facilities development will not be permitted. The necessary infrastructure and facilities include roads, schools, bus routes, playing fields and open space, community and other facilities. To secure this infrastructure and facilities it is appropriate to negotiate for developer provision or contributions through planning obligations or other appropriate arrangements e.g. planning conditions, highway and drainage agreements.

14. 29 Purpose: To secure from the developers provision of or financial contributions towards specifically identified infrastructure in accordance with Circular 05/05 (Planning Obligations) principles.

Policy Hr 3

Prior to granting planning permission, the provision of appropriate contributions towards the following infrastructure and facilities necessary for the development of allocated housing sites and unidentified sites in Horley will be secured by negotiation:

(i) Public transport (Policies Hr 21 and Hr 22);
(ii) Pedestrian and cycling routes (Policy Hr 23);
(iii) New roads and junctions (Policy Hr 24);
(iv) Recreation and leisure (Policies Hr 33, Hr 34, and Hr 35);
(v) Riverside Green Chain(Policy Hr 38);
(vi) Education (Policies Hr 39 and Hr 40);
(vii) Community facilities (Policies Hr 41 and Hr 42A).

Amplification

(1) Such provision or contributions will be secured by the Borough Council through negotiation on Section 106 planning obligations and other appropriate arrangements.
(2) The above list is of the main items of infrastructure but there may also be unforeseen (and other minor items) to which the developers will also be required to provide or contribute.
(3) Affordable housing will also be secured through section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as substituted by the 1991 Act) planning obligations but is not included in this policy but is included in the housing allocation policies and in Policy Ho 2
(4) The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.
(5) The Borough Council has taken account of the guidance in Circular05/05. It is satisfied that the requirement of the provision of or contributions towards infrastructure and facilities as specified in the policy is necessary, relevant to planning, and directly related to the proposed development. The level and timing of the provision or contributions is a matter for detailed negotiation and will need to be fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind and reasonable in all other respects.
(6) The Borough Council has prepared the Horley Infrastructure Provision Supplementary Planning Document to explain its proposals for each item of infrastructure or a new facility in detail, together with other related matters.

HOUSING PROVISION

Structure Plan Requirements

14.30 Policy DP4 in the Surrey Structure Plan 1994 requires provision to be made in Horley for 1300 dwellings in the period 2001 to 2006, with provision for a further 1300 dwellings post 2006. The Plan is based on a sequential approach which starts with the re-used, previously developed land and buildings (brownfield sites) before moving onto potential urban extensions on greenfield sites. The Urban Capacity Study (2000) identified in the region of 400 units. Thus, to accommodate an additional 2600 units, it has been necessary to look to greenfield sites in order to meet the housing requirement in the Surrey Structure Plan.

14.31 Policy DP5 in the Surrey Structure Plan 1994 expects local plans to programme the release of land allocated for housing, if appropriate, having regard to the phasing provisions set out in Policy DP4 and the availability of infrastructure and services. This is considered essential to ensure land is not exhausted early in the plan period, given the strength of market demand and the environmental constraints that exist in Surrey. It is intended that the provision of new housing development in each phasing period should be cumulative with any surplus or shortfall being carried over into the next period. Policy DP5 also provides that development in advance of phasing on allocated sites will not be permitted, unless there is a significant land supply shortfall. Similarly, where there is a land supply excess, permission on unallocated land may be refused as premature. However, the Borough Council agreed with the Local Plan Inspector that, for Horley, the imperative of the comprehensive plan means that the 2006 date in the phasing is not helpful. Therefore, it is not used.

Housing Provision

Table 1: Housing provision in Horley at 31 March 2004

1.

Residual 1994 Structure Plan requirement

1991-2001

53

2.

1994 Structure Plan requirement

Post 2001

2600

3.

 

Sub total

2653

 

Local Plan Housing Provision

 

 

4.

Large sites with permission

 

91

5.

Proposed Urban sites

 

165

6.

Small Sites estimate (SSE)

 

98 *

 

 

 

 

7.

North West sector

 

1570

8.

North East sector

 

710

9.

 

Sub total

2634

10.

Potential surplus (9-3)

 

-19

*SSE assumes 14 units per annum on unidentified sites for 7 years using a threshold of less than 10 units

New Housing Provision

14.32 Introduction: The following policies give an estimate of the net capacity of the proposed sites, the amount of affordable housing and small unit provision required.

14.33 The dwelling numbers given in the housing policies are an estimate for the purpose of ensuring that there is adequate land available to meet the Structure Plan requirement. They represent the Borough Council’s best estimate of the likely dwelling yield from each site, based on an analysis of the constraints and opportunities of each site, the other considerations which will influence the development of the site, and the advice in PPG 3 on making the most efficient use of land. These estimates are not determinative of the number of dwellings which will be acceptable when any planning application is made. Thumbnail sketches, in Appendix 6, have been prepared for all the housing sites except Hr 14 (NW sector) and Hr 16 (NE Sector), in respect of which Framework Plans are to be required. The thumbnail sketches are intended to act as a guide for developers, local residents and other interested parties when planning applications are made.

14.34 It should be noted that some policies have a requirement for both a minimum provision for affordable housing and a minimum provision for small units. One set of criteria will be used to establish the size and type of affordable units required and a different set of criteria to establish a small dwelling requirement. If the affordable requirement includes some small dwellings, these would also count towards the small dwelling requirement for the site.

14.35 Purpose: To identify the larger sites for new housing development in Horley which, together with existing commitments, can meet the requirements of the Surrey Structure Plan 1994.

Land at Lumley Road and Albert Road, Horley

Policy Hr 4: completed

Land at 133-143, Victoria Road, Horley

Policy Hr 5: completed

Land at 67-81 Smallfield Road, Horley

Policy Hr 6: completed

Land at 121 and 123 Smallfield Road, Horley

Policy Hr 7: deleted (2005) following Inspectors Recommendation

Land at the Grove, Horley

Policy Hr 8

Land at the Grove, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for housing development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 30 units;
(ii) a minimum of 8 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements; and
(iii) all units shall be either one or two bed units.

Amplification

(1) Further information on this site is provided in the form of a “thumbnail sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) Land should be made available for improvements to the junction of Victoria Road and Station Approach.Land at Whitmore Way, Horley

Policy Hr 9

Land at Depot site, Whitmore Way, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for housing development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 32 units;
(ii) a minimum of 8 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements; and
(iii) a minimum of 8 one and two bedroom units and a mix of other dwelling sizes.

Amplification

(1) Further information on this site is provided in the form of a “thumbnail sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) The access serving the development should be designed in such a way that it is capable of serving the possible long-term future development of the Lee Street Sewage Treatment Works for residential purposes. The adjoining Sewage Treatment Works have not been allocated as a housing site as there is no certainty that it will be released in time to contribute towards meeting the current Structure Plan requirement. In the event that it is no longer required for operational purposes, any planning application for its redevelopment for residential use will be considered on its merits, subject to it complying with other policies and provisions of the Plan.
(3) The proportion of affordable housing sought on this site is directly related to the overall scale of development envisaged. If therefore negotiations result in an increase in the total number of units to be developed then a proportionate increase in affordable housing units will be required. A proportion of the affordable housing should be one and two bedroom units. However, there is also a need for larger affordable family sized units. A proportion of the one and two bedroom units should be open market housing. Where the housing is both one and two bedroom units and affordable it will count towards meeting both of the minimum requirements.
(4) Any proposal will be required to take into account the ecological value of the adjacent Treatment Works SNCI.

Land at 1-19 Lee Street, Horley

Policy Hr 10: completed

Land at 30, 32 Russells Crescent and 2,4 and 6 Cheyne Walk, Horley

Policy Hr 11: deleted following Inspectors Recommendation

Land at Mitchells Builders Yard and 24 Massetts Road, Horley

Policy Hr 12: completed

Land at Wilgers Farm, Smallfield Road

Policy Hr 13: deleted following Inspectors Recommendation

Land at Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector)

Policy Hr 14

Land at Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector), as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for housing development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 1570 units;
(ii) a minimum of 393 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements; and
(iii) a minimum of 393 units of one and two bedroom units and a mix of other dwelling sizes.

The provision will be subject to phasing to be agreed as part of the Framework Plan.

Amplification

(1) Further information on the development of this new neighbourhood is contained in other policies and will be detailed in a Framework Plan. These plans should be prepared by developers in advance of any planning application. They should indicate the intended general road layout and pedestrian and cycle routes, the bus routes and any priority measures, traffic management measures; the broad layout of the neighbourhood centres; the nature, density and phasing of the housing; the treatment of the edges of the site where it abuts both existing development and the countryside; and the general location of the larger play spaces.
(2) In order that development and the provision of infrastructure proceeds in a co-ordinated manner, the phasing of individual housing parcels shall be in accordance with an agreed plan forming part of the Framework Plan or as otherwise agreed in writing by the Borough Council.
(3) The proportion of affordable housing sought on this site is directly related to the overall scale of development envisaged. If therefore negotiations result in an increase in the total number of units to be developed then a proportionate increase in affordable housing units will be required. A proportion of the affordable housing should be one and two bedroom units. However, there is also a need for larger affordable family sized units. A proportion of the one and two bedroom units should be open market housing. If the housing is both one and two bedroom units and affordable it will count towards meeting both of the minimum requirements.
(4) Special considerations in the development of this site include:

(i) opportunities for wildlife habitat enhancement and creation;
(ii) the provision of buffer zones to watercourses where required in order to protect their nature conservation value, prevent pollution and to allow access;
(iii) retention of watercourses without culverting unless demonstrated it is not possible to avoid unacceptable loss of riparian habitat and of continuity;
(iv) the carrying out of an ecological survey highlighting any protected species on the site before development commences; and
(v) the carrying out of a contamination survey where required before development commences to establish whether there is potential for the pollution of the water environment.

5) Any buildings or landraising should be outside the 1 in 100 year event floodplain envelope. Between the 1 in 100 year event floodline and the 1 in 100 year plus 20% floodline appropriate flood protection and mitigation measures will be required, to take into account the impact of climate change, in particular, as detailed in the Flood Risk Development Brief in the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document
(6) As there are no proposals to relocate Lee Street Sewage Treatment Works the layout should take into account the proximity of the works and safeguard the living conditions of the future occupiers of the new dwellings.

Land at Bonehurst Road, Horley

Policy Hr 15: deleted following Inspectors Recommendation

Land at Langshott and Lake Lane, Horley (N E Sector)

Policy Hr 16

Land at Langshott and Lake Lane, Horley (N E Sector), as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for housing development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 710 units;
(ii) a minimum of 178 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements; and
(iii) a minimum of 178 units of one and two bedroom units and a mix of other dwelling sizes.

The provision will be subject to phasing to be agreed as part of the Framework Plan.

Amplification

(1) Further information on the development of this new neighbourhood is contained in other policies and will be detailed in a Framework Plan (see Policy Hr 14 for details).
(2) In order that development and the provision of infrastructure proceeds in a co-ordinated manner, the phasing of individual housing parcels shall be in accordance with an agreed plan forming part of the Framework Plan or as otherwise agreed in writing by the Borough Council.
(3) The proportion of affordable housing sought on this site is directly related to the overall scale of development envisaged. If therefore negotiations result in an increase in the total number of units to be developed then a proportionate increase in affordable housing units will be required. A proportion of the affordable housing should be one and two bedroom units. However, there is also a need for larger affordable family sized units. A proportion of the one and two bedroom units should be open market housing. If the housing is both one and two bedroom units and affordable it will count towards meeting both of the minimum requirements.
(4) Special considerations in the development of this site include:

(i) opportunities for wildlife habitat enhancement and creation;
(ii) the provision of buffer zones to watercourses where required in order to protect their nature conservation value, prevent pollution and to allow access;
(iii) retention of watercourses without culverting unless demonstrated it is not possible to avoid unacceptable loss of riparian habitat and of continuity;
(iv) the carrying out of an ecological survey highlighting any protected species on the site before development commences; and
(v) the carrying out of a contamination survey where required before development commences to establish whether there is potential for the pollution of the water environment.

(4) Any buildings or landraising should be outside the 1 in 100 year event floodplain envelope. Between the 1 in 100 year event floodline and the 1 in 100 year plus 20% floodline appropriate flood protection and mitigation measures will be required, to take into account the impact of climate change, in particular, as detailed in the Flood Risk Development Brief in the Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document.

Land on the North side of Victoria Road Horley including the Library and 13-19 Kings Road.

Policy Hr 17

Land on the North side of Victoria Road, Horley, including the Library and 13-19 Kings Road, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for housing development, subject to the replacement of the existing community uses, prior to development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 68 units;
(ii) a minimum of 17 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements;
(iii) the majority of units shall be one or two bedroom units with a small number of 3 bed dwellings to the rear of the site.

Amplification

(1) Further information on this site is provided in the form of a “thumbnail sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) The proportion of affordable housing sought on this site is directly related to the overall scale of development envisaged. If therefore negotiations result in an increase in the total number of units to be developed then a proportionate increase in affordable housing units will be required. A proportion of the affordable housing should be one and two bedroom units. However, there is also a need for larger affordable family sized units. A proportion of the one and two bedroom units should be open market housing. If the housing is both one and two bedroom units and affordable it will count towards meeting both of the minimum requirements.

Land at Former Court Lodge Playing Fields West of Gower Road, Hardy Close and Drake Road, Horley

Policy Hr 18: deleted following Inspectors Recommendation

Development in Areas Affected by Aircraft Noise

14.36 Introduction: PPG 24: Planning and Noise (1994), introduced the concept of Noise Exposure Categories (NECs) to help local planning authorities to determine appropriate areas for new housing development. The categories range from A, where noise is unlikely to be a determining factor, to D, where development should be refused. A recommended range of noise levels for each NEC is set out in the PPG. Although the ranges cover both the day and night periods, the Government is not producing any night time contours until research into the appropriateness of their use is undertaken. Current policy around Gatwick Airport continues to be based only on the use of daytime contours.

14.37 Although the onset of community annoyance has traditionally been taken to be 57 Leq, PPG24 permits housing development up to 66 Leq, but says 60 Leq should be regarded as the desirable upper limit for major new housing development. The Borough Council considers that 57 Leq would be more appropriate, but a departure from the PPG is unlikely to be acceptable without detailed justification.

14.38 Purpose: To update the existing policy so as to ensure that new housing is not permitted if it would - either now or in the foreseeable future - be exposed to unacceptable levels of noise from aircraft using Gatwick Airport.

Policy Hr 19

In areas near Gatwick Airport, housing development will be subject to the following criteria:

(i) developments of 10 units and over will not be permitted in those areas over the 60 Leq contour: and
(ii) developments of less than 10 units will be permitted in those areas between the 60 and 66 Leq contours provided appropriate sound insulation is provided.

Amplification

(1) Noise contour maps are prepared annually in arrears by the Department Transport, and forecasts are also produced on an occasional basis by BAA Gatwick. This Policy should be read in conjunction with the currently adopted contour map or such other contour map as may be adopted at a future date. Note: With the expected growth of Gatwick Airport it is desirable that forecast worst case contours are used for planning purposes. Forecast contours have been produced by BAA Gatwick for 2003 and 2008, in connection with the Gatwick Airport Sustainable Development Strategy 2000. Their adoption in place of the currently adopted contour map (a 1996 forecast) will be considered, if appropriate.
(2) Sound insulation by upgrading the glazing and roof structure is necessary to provide adequate protection from noise disturbance during the day and to ensure people are not disturbed during the restorative process of sleep. A secondary or other glazing system should be installed to provide a 35 dB(A) noise reduction when the window lights are closed. An air conditioning or other suitable mechanical ventilation system should be installed to ensure windows can be kept closed even during the warm summer months. The roof and ceiling structure should be designed to meet 48 D’nT,w the weighted standardised level difference as defined in BS 5821 : Part 1 : 1984 Methods for rating the sound insulation in buildings and interior building elements.

EMPLOYMENT

14.39 In preparing the comprehensive and co-ordinated strategy for Horley with sustainable development as its objective, consideration of the economic prosperity of the area is a key element. However, historically Horley is part of the Crawley/Gatwick sub-region. Following the Examination in Public into the 1994 Surrey Structure Plan, the panel concluded that “there is not sufficient justification for proposing major commercial development in the Horley area: indeed any such provision would only serve to exacerbate existing housing shortages in the Crawley/Gatwick area and thereby diminish the benefit to be gained by the release of land for housing.” Consequently, the Plan’s strategy envisages no new major commercial development for Horley.

14.40 Nevertheless, existing Structure Plan and Local Plan policies are aimed at maintaining and renewing the existing economy whilst balancing this with environmental protection of the area. The Plan’s strategy acknowledges that there are a number of employment opportunities through these existing policies:

1. Existing allocations of new land for industrial distribution and storage uses remain at Salfords Goods Yard and at the Horley Gas Works (Policy Em 9), but it is not now proposed to pursue those at the Lee Street Sewage Works and the adjoining Council owned site at Whitmore Way for environmental reasons.

2. The focus for retail and commercial activities will continue to be Horley town centre, where existing allocations are provided within the Town Centre Business area (Policy Em 4) and Town Centre Shopping area (Policy Em 5) and on Integrated Mixed Use sites (Policy Em 7), together with Areas for Small Businesses (Policy Em 6) on the fringe of the town centre.

3.Although the new Waitrose supermarket, opened in 1999, led to the redesignation of the Victoria Road Area for Small Businesses as retail frontage and the loss of the Retailing Warehousing Area, there were employment benefits as a result.

4. Additional small-scale employment opportunities are proposed through provision in the new neighbourhood centres and for some innovative combined dwelling/work spaces in the new neighbourhoods themselves (Policy Hr 20).

5 Further, a new borough wide Policy Em 1A seeks to protect the stock of all suitably located industrial and commercial land.

14.41 In addition, Fastway will connect Crawley, Gatwick, Horley railway station, Horley town centre and the new neighbourhoods, thereby supporting journeys to work to the main employment areas. The MORI survey findings showed roughly a third of Horley residents living and working in Horley; a third travelling south to Gatwick and Crawley for work; and a third travelling north to Redhill/Reigate, other parts of Surrey, or commuting to Croydon or London.

Employment within the Allocated Residential Neighbourhoods

14.42 Introduction: To encourage local employment opportunities and to strengthen the neighbourhood centres, the Borough Council is seeking the provision of some small scale commercial opportunities, within the confines of the policies of the Plan. In order that this range of differing employment opportunities can be provided and maintained the Borough Council is seeking the provision of a limited number of small units and home/work spaces within the two allocated residential neighbourhoods, planned at the outset.

14.43 Purpose: To facilitate small scale employment opportunities such as workspaces, teleworking centres alongside the neighbourhood centres etc.

Policy Hr 20

Within the Neighbourhood Centre for the North West Sector, as shown on the Proposals Map, development will be permitted for up to 1,000m2 of commercial (Class B1) floorspace, consisting of individual units of no more than 150m2. Proposals that exceed this level or cater for other uses will not be permitted, unless justified by the particular needs of a small business.

In the North West and North East Sectors small work spaces linked to dwellings will be permitted provided that the following criteria are met:-

(i) each workspace is provided within the curtilage of a dwelling;
(ii) use of the workspace is principally by those persons residing within the dwelling to which the workspace is linked;
(iii) the floor area of the unit is no more than 50% of the ground floor area of the dwelling to which it is associated or 30m2, whichever is the greater;
(iv) the design and scale of the unit respects the residential character and amenities of the surrounding area;
(v) the use of the unit would not have a detrimental impact on the amenities of adjoining residents in terms of noise or activity;
(vi) a satisfactory means for the storage and collection of refuse is provided; and
(vii) the proposal does not result in the loss of existing or proposed recreation, shopping, or community areas or urban open land.

Amplification

(1) To ensure that the accommodation in the Neighbourhood Centre for the North West Sector is only suitable for small businesses a condition will be placed on planning permissions requiring a range of suite sizes up to a maximum of 150 sq.m.
(2) In order to minimise the impact on the amenities of future residents, proposals for home/work spaces should be planned at the initial stages of the development.
(3) To ensure that any commercial accommodation or workspace, within the neighbourhood areas, is not detrimental to the amenities of adjoining residents a condition will be placed on any planning permissions restricting the use of the unit to Class B1.
(4) In order to maintain the residential nature of the housing areas, clusters of up to a maximum of 6 units may be acceptable in any one location to be identified in the Framework Plans (see Policies Hr 14 and 16), and may also include the North East Sector Neighbourhood Centre.
(5) The scale and design of any unit should be appropriate to the dwelling to which it relates, for example, separate structures should resemble garages in form and size.
(6) A condition will be attached to commercial units attached to dwellings requiring that they remain used in association with the dwelling. Permission will not be granted for the separation of the commercial use from the residential use.
(7) Workspaces linked to dwellings must be well designed to avoid detrimental impact on neighbouring residents and the character of the area.

MOVEMENT

Introduction

14.44 Government guidance in PPG 13: Transport (2001) highlights three key aims in relation to transport and land use policies. Firstly, to reduce the need to travel and length of journeys; secondly, to encourage alternative means of travel with less environmental impact; and, finally, to reduce reliance on the private car.

14.45 These are reflected in the proposals and policies for movement in the Plan. The new neighbourhoods have been planned on the basis of achieving a significant reduction in peak hour traffic by the provision of pedestrian and cycle routes, both within and between neighbourhoods and local destinations such as schools and by the integration of the development with Fastway, a high quality bus network linking with the sub-region. The design of the neighbourhood road network should facilitate both of the above, giving advantage to those modes over the private car.

14.46 The policies identify the pedestrian and cycle routes and related facilities, the high quality bus network and the need for interchange in the Town Centre with other existing buses serving Horley and the rail network.

14.47 The new neighbourhoods will be accessed primarily from the main road network and the necessary new links are outlined in a policy and shown on the Proposals Map. However the routes are only indicative at this stage. This particular policy also identifies certain junction improvements to be carried out in conjunction with the new neighbourhoods.

14.48 The way in which car parking is planned, provided and managed can also have a significant impact on the Government’s intended shift away from private car use towards other modes of transport. This will influence both the volume of spaces provided in new developments, often dependent on location, and the management of public town centre spaces through length of stay and pricing controls.

Public Transport

14.49 Introduction: Development of 2600 dwellings and related community facilities at Horley requires the provision of a high quality bus network in order to encourage a modal shift away from private car usage, particularly during the peak hours and to provide transport for those without access to a car. It is important that the new bus network, part of a wider system also serving the Gatwick/Crawley area, is provided and ready for use from the outset, thereby reducing the potential for less sustainable household travel patterns being established based wholly on the private car. There is already high quality bus access to the North East sector site perimeter.

14.50 Purpose: To secure the provision of a high quality bus network as an integral part of comprehensive development proposals in Horley.

Policy Hr 21

High quality bus routes and priorities, shall be provided in conjunction with the allocated housing sites and unidentified sites, in accordance with general principles indicated on the Proposals Map and on Figure 1.

Amplification

(1) The high quality buses are new low floor (for easy access), low emission vehicles with high levels of comfort and convenience. Through congested parts of its route to and from Gatwick and Crawley they will be assisted by bus priority measures and, beyond the Borough boundary, guided along dedicated lanes, in order to ensure a fast frequent service.
(2) The routes and priorities shall be provided in a manner consistent with each agreed Framework plan to ensure that, as far as practicable, the associated high quality bus system can be operational as soon as each appropriate phase is occupied.
(3) The Fastway route is shown diagrammatically on the Proposals Map and in Figure 1. The detailed routing is to be agreed as part of the detailed design. Detailed design will be the subject of consultation with appropriate agencies, including horse riding interests, where relevant.
(4) The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.
(5) In order to provide good accessibility to new residents on the allocated housing sites, thereby encouraging sustainable travel patterns, the bus stops should be no further than 400 metres or 5 minutes walk from any new dwelling.
(6) The routes are being served by single deck buses, but for maximum flexibility routes should be designed to be capable of accommodating double-decker buses.
(7) The provision of appropriate passenger waiting and information facilities should be an integral part of the network. Information facilities include the provision of computerised information or route planning terminals at Neighbourhood Centres and the Town Centre.

Interchange Facilities

14.51 Introduction: The provision of a highly accessible public transport network in conjunction with the housing sites will be of great value in encouraging a shift away from private car usage. However, the effectiveness and potential success of such a network will be enhanced by ensuring that it forms part of an integrated transport network. Clearly the Horley public transport network must connect with Fastway in Horley town centre and at Horley Station, which is served by the London/Gatwick/Brighton railway line.

14.52 Purpose: To ensure that the high quality bus networks which serve existing areas and allocated housing sites connect satisfactorily with the wider networks at identified interchange locations.

Policy Hr 22

The following sites are shown on the Proposals Map (Town Centre Inset) and on Figure 1 as public transport interchange facilities:

(i) interchange between bus and rail at Horley Station; and
(ii) high quality bus stop facilities within Horley Town Centre.

Amplification

(1) The interchanges shall be provided by the County Council as the Highway Authority, as far as practicable, at the outset, to ensure that the associated high quality public transport system can be operational as soon as the first houses are occupied. Agencies involved in the design and provision of the station interchange include the Borough and County Councils, developers of the housing sites, and Network Rail and the lead train operating company, in view of the rail operational issues involved. Funding will be negotiated from the developers of the allocated housing sites and unidentified sites, together with the developers of the site adjacent to the station in The Drive. The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.
(2) Interchanges are shown diagrammatically on Figure 1 and the Proposals Map (Town Centre Inset). The details of these facilities will be negotiated outside the plan process.

Pedestrian and Cycle Routes

14.53 Introduction: Making it easier to walk and cycle will contribute in some way towards a reduction in car use. Routes are necessary both within the allocated housing sites, to local destinations such as primary schools and neighbourhood centres and to destinations further afield, such as the secondary school, town centre and to connect with longer distance cycle routes. The railway line is a significant barrier to cross town movements. This affects the NE Sector in that it is a barrier to movements to and from the town centre and it affects the NW Sector in that it is a barrier to movements to and from Oakwood School. Therefore, a major remodelling of the existing subway for pedestrians and dismounted cyclists is proposed to help overcome these problems and is a requirement directly related to the new developments.

14.54 Purpose: To identify the pedestrian and cycle routes as part of the spine network in the town and to secure the provision of a finer grain network within the two major development sites.

Policy Hr 23

A spine network of convenient, safe and direct pedestrian and cycle routes, to be provided in conjunction with the allocated housing sites and unidentified sites, is shown on Figure 2 and on the Proposals Map.
A local network of pedestrian and cycle routes will be required within the two major development sites.

Specific traffic management measures will be required for the provision of safe crossings between the spine network and new access roads within the allocated housing sites and at certain locations in the existing urban area, as shown on the Proposals Map.

A remodelled subway for pedestrians and dismounted cyclists crossing east of Consort Way East, to overcome the severance effect of the London-Brighton railway in the town centre, is shown on the Proposals Map.

Amplification

(1) The routes and remodelled subway shall be provided, as far as practicable, at the outset to ensure that they can be operational as soon as the first houses are occupied.
(2) The Spine Network of routes is shown diagrammatically on Figure 2 and on the Proposals Map
(3) The design of routes for pedestrians and cyclists should accord with the “Cycle Facility Design Guide” produced by Surrey County Council, and the Borough Council’s Horley Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document.
(4) Funding for the remodelled subway will be negotiated from the developers of the allocated housing sites and unidentified sites as part of the Spine Pedestrian and Cycle Network. Further improvements to this part of the High Street should be undertaken in conjunction with the development of the High Street Car Park set out in Policy Hr 30. The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.

New Roads and Junction Improvements

14.55 Introduction: The major housing sites at Meath Green and Langshott are such that they could not be accessed through the adjacent network of residential roads. Accordingly, there is a need to connect them direct to the main road network. In addition, certain existing junctions within the urban area which are already operating close to capacity need to be improved in order to accommodate traffic generated by the new housing development in Horley. This includes at least one junction outside the Borough.

14.56 The Borough and County Councils are aware that appropriate traffic calming will be needed to prevent or control the use of the country lanes to the north and west of Horley from being used by through traffic, especially Picketts Lane, New House Lane, Meath Green Lane and Lonesome Lane. The County Council will determine the design of such measures in due course but remains keen to hear from the public about what sort of measures that they consider to be most appropriate. Similar measures may also be necessary on local roads within the urban areas of Horley to the south of the new neighbourhoods.

14.57 Purpose: To identify where there will be new roads and junction improvements required by the development having taken into account the provision for other modes.

Policy Hr 24

The following new roads and junction improvements, to be provided in conjunction with the allocated housing sites and unidentified sites, are shown on the Proposals Map:

(i) an access road from the A23 and A217 together with junction improvements into Land at Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector);
(ii) an access road between Cross Oak Lane and Ladbroke Road together with improvements to Cross Oak Lane and its junction with A23 to access the land at Langshott/Lake Lane, Horley, (NE Sector);
(iii) A23/B2036 “Chequers” roundabout;
(iv) Smallfield Road/Balcombe Road junction;
(v) Balcombe Road/Victoria Road junction; and
(vi) A23/Victoria Road junction

Amplification

(1) The new roads and junction improvements shall be provided, as far as practicable, at the outset to ensure that they are available as soon as the first houses are occupied.
(2) The approach to infrastructure provision in relation to unidentified sites will be applied flexibly to make sure that it does not inappropriately influence the quantum of the eventual development.
(3) In the case of item (i) of the Policy, the proposed access road would be designed for low vehicle speeds to reflect its principal role as a means of access, with the design such that it discourages use by through traffic. It is conceivable that this road could be constructed in two sections, i.e. from each main road, only connecting to form a complete route by a particular stage of the neighbourhood development. In any event at least one of the access roads’ junctions with the ‘A’ roads must be constructed before any other works commence so that no construction traffic uses the local residential road network. However, it may be in the best interests of the community if the complete route is constructed from the outset.
(4) All the above new roads and junction improvements will involve alterations to the classified road network. As such, the County Council as Highway Authority must be consulted and involved in the design process.
(5) Detailed design of junctions may require provision for bus priority measures, pedestrian, cycle and where necessary equestrian facilities.
(6) There is a need, in general terms, for the new access roads and junction improvements in order to accommodate the projected traffic from the housing developments. Therefore, the routes of the access roads are shown on the Proposals Map. However, although the routes have evolved from discussions with landowners, reflect landscape and ground conditions and attempt to minimise impact on existing residential property, they cannot yet be regarded as precisely aligned. As such they remain indicative at this stage, and specific Environmental Assessments will be required for these new roads. Details of the necessary junction improvements are still under consideration.
(7) There will be a requirement for the developers to enter into an appropriate agreement with the County Council, as Highway Authority, and to indemnify them in relation to any potential claims under part 1 of the Land and Compensation Act 1973.
(8) Junction improvements have been required to the Longbridge Roundabout (Junction of the A23 and A217). However, this is not located within the Borough so it has not been possible to include this junction on the Proposals Map.
(9) The Borough and County Councils are aware that appropriate traffic calming will be required to be undertaken by the developers on existing roads. However, the details of this are still under consideration.

Figure 1: Public Transport Routes

Figure 1: Public Transport Routes

Figure 2: Indicative Spine Cycle Network

Figure 2: Indicative Spine Cycle Network

HORLEY TOWN CENTRE (SEE INSET MAP)

Introduction

14.58 Horley’s current role is that of a convenient and accessible ‘local’ town centre providing opportunities for convenience and comparison shopping commensurate with its size. The centre also provides for health and community uses but has limited leisure facilities. Its customer base is primarily its own population.

14.59 An essential part of the town’s role is to be the focal point for a diversity of facilities and services. The concentration of these facilities within the town centre has two major advantages. Firstly, the town centre is accessible to alternative modes of transport thus reducing reliance on the motor car and secondly, it offers the possibility of ‘linked trips’ where one journey can serve several purposes e.g. doctors, library and shopping, thus reducing the need to travel.

14.60 The comprehensive revitalisation strategy (Horley Town Centre Study 1999) combined both land use and non land use issues. Its objectives were to create a sense of place with stronger gateways announcing the town centre and to increase the density of uses within and on the edge of the centre to enhance vitality. The extension of the town centre to the south to incorporate the railway station, the relocation of Waitrose and the extension of the Collingwood Bachelor department store are also likely to move the focus of the town eastwards.

14.61 It is essential that the enhancement of the High Street takes place to balance the south east attractors and ensure visitors are ‘pulled’ to the rest of the town. The existing High Street car park is allocated for office development with a landmark building and piazza creating a defined end to the fully pedestrianised High Street. This building will also help to screen the town from the effects of the railway and be expected to substantially improve the existing subway entrance to and from the town.

14.62 The strategy recognises the importance of short stay visitor parking to the health of Horley town centre. It is therefore the intention to maintain the existing number of short stay parking spaces especially at peak times. This will be achieved through an overall parking and pricing strategy for the town discriminating against commuter parking, and through s106 agreements on new developments securing public access to private parking provision on weekends and bank holidays.

14.63 The strategy recognises the important link between Horley town centre and Gatwick Airport. Opportunities to improve the special relationship will be encouraged, where appropriate, whether this is commercial development to accommodate companies which service the airline industry, or hotels and guest houses which cater for airline passengers. The town’s role will remain one of serving its own residents and workers every day needs, together with limited comparison shopping whilst recognising its proximity to Gatwick Airport.

14.64 The additional catchment population should serve as a catalyst for the improvement of the existing centre resulting in fewer vacant properties and a consolidation of its economic position. By increasing the number of potential visitors to the town centre (through population growth, additional employment and improved accessibility) the centre should become a more attractive financial proposition for developers and retailers alike, thus resulting in improved facilities and an improvement to the town’s vitality and viability. This approach of focusing on accessibility is both directly related to the proposed large scale residential development and consistent with issues of sustainability.

Enhancing Vitality and Viability

14.65 Introduction: Government guidance PPG 6: Town Centres and Retail Development and PPG 13: Transport, states that Development Plans should aim to reduce the need to travel, especially by car. To meet these aims plans should promote development, especially major generators of travel demand, within existing town centres which are highly accessible by means other than the private car. This strategic approach applies to employment, retail, leisure and educational uses all of which are most appropriately located within the Borough’s Town Centres and to residential use which can also benefit from such a location. It is essential therefore to actually define the Town Centre area on the Proposals Map. 14.76. The comprehensive revitalisation strategy (Horley Town Centre Study; 1999) requires all the allocated development sites to contribute towards townscape, accessibility and public transport improvements to the town centre. This is necessary if it is to function effectively, bearing in mind the level of new development proposed.

14.66 Purpose: To direct high traffic generating uses to the town centre to help reduce the need to travel especially by car and to contribute to the vitality and viability of the Town Centre, and to secure necessary improvements.

Policy Hr 25

Horley Town Centre, as defined on the Proposals Map, will continue to be the focal point for employment, retail, leisure, cultural, community/educational and residential uses and encouragement will be given to proposals that make a positive contribution towards the town’s vitality and viability.

The provision of or contribution towards townscape, accessibility and public transport improvements will be negotiated in connection with the development of the sites allocated in Policies Hr 27 to Hr 31 inclusive. Such provision or contributions will be secured through Section 106 planning obligations or other appropriate arrangements.

Amplification

(1) Specific items, such as traffic calming, “gateways”, and public transport interchange improvements (see Policy Hr 22) are necessary to fulfil the strategy, but there may also be unforeseen and other minor items which developers will also be required to provide or contribute towards. New office development will also be required to make its office parking spaces available for public use at weekends and on bank holidays, in accordance with Policy Mo 8.
(2) The Borough Council has taken account of the guidance in Circular05/05. It is satisfied that the requirement of the provision of or contribution towards these improvements in the town centre is necessary, relevant to planning, and directly related to the proposed development. The level and timing of the provision or contributions is a matter for detailed negotiation and will need to be fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind and reasonable in all other respects.
(3) The Borough Council will monitor the performance of the Town Centre through regular “Health Checks”. These are to be carried out in association with the County Council and the other Surrey Districts to enable relevant comparisons of performance to be made with other similar types of centres.
(4) The Borough Council will produce and keep under review a Town Centre Strategy, which will continue to inform necessary policy changes.

Pedestrian Priority Area

14.67 Introduction: Pedestrian Priority Areas and sensitive landscaping are major elements in the Borough Council’s objective of improving the physical environment of Horley town centre. This is being carried out in phases. Phase 1 was undertaken in 1988, so that the western part of High Street now has priority for pedestrians, with limited access for essential service vehicles. The implementation of Phase 2, would follow the development of the site between Lumley Road and Albert Road and the development of the High Street car park.

14.68 Purpose: To contribute to the vitality and viability of the Town Centre; To make the Town Centre a more pedestrian friendly environment without detriment to the town’s vitality and viability.

Policy Hr 26

The Pedestrian Priority Area in High Street, Horley, will be extended, as shown on the Proposals Map.

Amplification

(1) Other action to be taken by the Borough Council to effect the scheme will involve traffic management, including a repositioned restriction order on Lumley Road, which is necessary to allow only (through) traffic seeking access to the town centre. Such measures were introduced in Albert Road in 1985.
(2) The traffic management measures in Lumley Road and Albert Road will be undertaken as part of the development of the pedestrian priority areas
(3) The pedestrian areas will be subject to a comprehensive landscaping treatment including paving, planting and appropriately designed street furniture. Specific provision will be made for cyclists and for the disabled and for restricted servicing of retail units if necessary.
(4) The proposed development of the High Street Car Park (Policy Hr 30) will be required to contribute to the funding of the pedestrianisation scheme. Contributions will be secured by seeking Section 106 planning obligations.

Land between Albert Road and Lumley Road, Horley

14.69 Policy Hr 27 deleted (2005) as development completed.

Central Car Park, Horley

14.70 Introduction: This site previously formed part of Policy Hr 4 in the 1994 Local Plan, along with the High Street car park and those retail units fronting the south side of the High Street and part of Victoria Road excluding Iceland and Collingwood Bachelor. The High Street car park is now subject to Policy Hr30. The existing retail units have been excluded from the proposed site.

14.71 The Central car park site is a large potential development site within Horley Town Centre, within the Borough Council’s ownership. At present it fulfils an important function as a pay and display car park and is well used.

14.72 Whilst it is the Borough Council’s strategy to reduce the need to travel by car and to offer alternative modes of transport to potential visitors it is essential that the town remains attractive to people who arrive by car. The main need is for parking that serves the centre as a whole rather than dedicated parking for individual developments. The priority is for short stay parking for visitors to the town centre, such as shoppers as opposed to long stay commuter parking.

14.73 The development of the High Street car park results in the Saturday market having to relocate. The Central car park is the most suitable site. The loss in customer car parking on this site on Saturdays, is to be compensated for by the availability for public use of the weekday private office parking associated with the Lumley Road/ Albert Road redevelopment, the Former Henry’s Garage site redevelopment and the office development on the High Street car park. This is in line with Policy Mo 8 and will be a requirement of planning permission being granted on these sites.

14.74 Purpose: To contribute to the vitality of the Town Centre. To provide an attractive short stay parking facilities and a location for the town’s Saturday market.

Policy Hr 28

The Central car park, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map shall be retained for short stay customer parking.

The site, as shown on the Proposals Map, will be designed to accommodate a Saturday market and shall be available prior to the redevelopment of the High Street Car Park (Policy Hr 30).

Amplification

(1) Consideration will be given to altering the access to the car park to a single point on Consort Way East thus allowing avoiding the use of the service road.
(2) An important part of the Town Centre strategy is to improve the appearance and role of the central car park. The development of the High Street car park and the relocation of the Saturday market will enhance this space and this could be further enhanced through encouraging improvements to the appearance of the rear of the retail units backing onto the site. This will help integrate the car park and the pedestrianised High Street as well as improving the attractiveness of the route from the Waitrose car park to the rest of the Town.

Former Henry’s Garage site and No. 67-69, Victoria Road, Horley

14.75 Introduction: Part of this site is presently used as a car park for Virgin Airways adjacent office building (Newman House). In line with the revitalisation strategy for the Town Centre the site is allocated for office development. The development should be set back from the existing Victoria Road building line to enable a bus stop to be provided clear of the existing highway and, in keeping with other new office developments the private parking provision should be designed to allow it to be made publicly available for short stay shoppers on weekends and Bank Holidays.

14.76 Purpose: To contribute to the vitality of the Town Centre. To secure an appropriate commercial development in the Town Centre; provide a bus stop clear of the highway; to secure additional short stay car parking at weekends and secure improved rear servicing to the retail units on the south side of Victoria Road and Massetts Road.

Policy Hr 29

The former Henry’s Garage site and nos. 67-69, Victoria Road, Horley as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for office development. It will be an essential requirement of any scheme that the site accommodates a permanent bus stop clear of the existing highway and that the private parking space is made available to short stay shoppers at weekends and Bank holidays.

Rear servicing for premises on Massetts Road and Victoria Road should be provided.

Amplification

(1) Further information on this site is provided in the form of a “ thumbnail sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) The preferred access points originally envisaged in the 1994 Plan for providing rear servicing were at the south western side of the building at 17 Massetts Road, at the sites of 11-13 Massetts Road and the southern part of Victoria Road. Further investigations will be made to establish if this is still appropriate and feasible.
(3) Sufficient land shall be safeguarded fronting Victoria Road to enable a permanent layby and bus stop to be provided as part of the development.
(4) Private parking provision for the office component of the development shall be designed in such a way as to allow its public use by short stay shoppers at weekends and bank holidays at a price consistent with other town centre car parks. This will be secured through a Section 106 planning obligation.

High Street Car Park, Horley

14.77 Introduction: This site previously formed part of the Central Car park site (Policy Hr 4) in the 1994 Plan but is now the subject of a separate proposal. The site is allocated for an office development with a retail component incorporating improvements to the pedestrian underpass. The site has a very important role to play in urban design terms. It must give a focal point to the end of the High Street, it must act as a buffer to the railway and help to give a sense of enclosure to the Central car park. It is also essential that the entrance to the underpass is made more welcoming and attractive from both sides of the railway and needs therefore to be seen as an integral part of any development. A design brief will be produced for the site.

14.78 The relocation of the Saturday market to the Central car park (Policy Hr 28) necessitates additional parking being made available for short stay shoppers visiting the town. In keeping with the other new office developments the private parking provision should be designed to allow it to be made publicly available for short stay shoppers at weekends and Bank Holidays.

14.79 Purpose: To contribute to the vitality of the Town Centre. To make a significant contribution in urban design terms to the northern end of the High Street incorporating improvements to the subway. To provide public parking provision on weekends for short stay shoppers.

Policy Hr 30

The High Street car park, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for office development incorporating an element of Class A1 and A3* retail or community use and providing a pedestrianised external public space. The integration of and improvement to the existing subway will be an essential part of any scheme.

The private parking provision should be designed and made publicly available for short stay shoppers on weekends and Bank Holidays.

Amplification

(1) A design brief for the site will be produced paying particular attention to the treatment of the subway. Further information on this site is contained in the form of a “thumbnail sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) Private parking provision for the office component of the development shall be designed in such a way as to allow its public use by short stay shoppers at weekends and Bank Holidays at a price consistent with other town centre car parks. This will be secured through a Section 106 planning obligation.
(3) The Borough Council will seek to relocate the Saturday Market to an alternative and more permanent site within the Town Centre as detailed in Policy Hr 28.

* The Use Classes Order 1987, as amended in 2005, divides the old Class A3 into new A3, A4 and A5 categories (see Glossary). References to Class A3 in this plan should be considered as also applying to the new categories and the policies interpreted accordingly.

Land West of Horley Station, fronting Victoria Road, and 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 The Drive, Horley.

14.80 Introduction: The site is presently occupied partly as a station car park and partly for residential use. The redevelopment of this site for a multi storey residential scheme or a mixed use development (residential and offices) is intended to achieve a number of objectives. The site is to perform an important function in urban design terms in including a landmark structure defining the start of and entrance to the Town Centre. It will also contribute to the necessary improvements to the station building, either directly in terms of an integrated design or indirectly as funding, as the major part of the site is owned by Network Rail.

14.81 There is potential for a substantial building with variations in height and containing basement level parking provision. The northern most part of the site shall contain a focal point building clearly visible looking south from Victoria Road. The height of the buildings will increase moving east on the site away from The Drive. The parking requirement may be reduced reflecting the site’s location and accessibility to public transport.

14.82 Purpose: To contribute to the vitality of the Town Centre. To provide a distinctive building that defines the entrance to the Town Centre and contributes to the necessary improvements to Horley station

Policy Hr 31

The land West of Horley Station, fronting Victoria Road, and 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 The Drive, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for a multi storey residential scheme or a mixed use development. The following provisions will be required:

(i) 35 units;
(ii) a minimum of 6 units of affordable housing, secured by appropriate arrangements; and
(iii) all units shall be either one or two bed units.
Enhancements to the railway station will be an essential part of this scheme.

Amplification

(1) A design brief for the site will be produced by the Borough Council. Further information on this site is provided in the form of a “Thumbnail Sketch” in Appendix 6.
(2) Development on this site must fund significant enhancements to the railway station, such enhancements are likely to include a new covered walkway and stairs from ground level up to ticket hall level; a new ground level entrance with ticket machine to platform 1 from the western side of the station; provision of passenger lifts to all platforms; provision of public conveniences; modifications to the internal layout of the ticket hall and shop; modifications to the station car park entrance; provision of revised arrangements for car set down/pick up points and for taxi services, and additional secure cycle parking.
(3) Private parking provision for any office component of the development shall be designed in such a way as to allow its public use by short stay shoppers and theatre users at weekends and Bank Holidays at a price consistent with other Town centre car parks. This will be secured through a Section 106 planning obligation.
(4) Development must also comply with Policy Em 7 and the appropriate design and layout policies of this Plan.

Land at 1 and 1a, Cheyne Walk and 2,4,6 and 8, The Drive, Horley

14.83 Policy Hr 32: deleted (2005) following Inspectors recommendation.

RECREATION AND LEISURE

Land Allocations for Public Open Space

14.84 Introduction: The comprehensive approach to development of Horley provides an opportunity to ensure that the recreational needs of the new population of Horley are met in the most appropriate locations, through the provision of a range of additional facilities in line with recommendations of the National Playing Fields Association (NPFA). It also provides an opportunity to make provision for other recreational facilities, such as allotments and a riverside green chain of informal open space mainly on land which cannot be developed due to flooding and nature conservation value.

14.85 The NPFA standards recommend the provision of 2.4 hectares of outdoor playing space per 1,000 population. Surveys undertaken in 1985 showed a shortfall in provision in Horley of some 18 Ha. Provision to meet this shortfall in existing Policy Re 3 (part Fishers Farm / Bayhorne Farm, Balcombe Road, Horley), now new Policy Hr 33 and in existing Policy Re 4 (dual use proposals at Oakwood School) are to remain.

14.86 In addition, it has been calculated that further provision in the region of 15 Ha will be required for the additional 2,600 dwellings, 7.42 ha of which would be in the form of playing pitches. Kickabout areas for informal use are, therefore, proposed in each new neighbourhood, with provision for bookable pitches and changing accommodation in one location south of Smallfield Road) to achieve economies in layout, maintenance and management. The community halls proposed for each new neighbourhood will also provide opportunities for additional recreation and leisure facilities.

14.87 Leisure Needs Study and Facilities Requirement Assessment (Facilities Planning Model) were carried out for the Borough Council to give more detailed guidance on the range of facilities needed for Horley as a whole. The studies compare the existing supply of indoor and outdoor provision within the local catchment area (supply) with the current participation rates according to age and sex of users (demand). This information is then applied to the projected increased population to predict future trends and demands and to determine what facilities are required to meet this new demand. The studies identify a need in Horley for the following: standard size swimming pool, learner pool, sports hall (containing 4-6 badminton courts), indoor tennis courts, “pay” and “play” health and fitness facility and a Multi Use Games Area (MUGA).

14.88 Additional land is required for the Town Park at Smallfield Road, over the requirement that the NPFA standards recommended, because part of the site is affected by flooding.

14.89 Purpose: To allocate sufficient land for public open space to meet the needs of Horley residents.

Policy Hr 33

The following sites are allocated for public open space and are shown on the Proposals Map:

Site

Location

Area

Category

1

Land south side of Smallfield Road, Horley

10.2 Ha

Combined park and outdoor playing space

2

Land north of Langshott Kennels, Horley

0.64 Ha

Kickabout area

3

Land to west of Great Lake Farm, Horley

1.78 Ha

Kickabout area and formal Play provision

4

Land to north of Landens Farm, Meath Green Lane, Horley

0.76 ha

Kickabout area and formal Play provision

5

Part Fishers Farm/ Bayhorne Farm, Balcombe Road, Horley (Previously Policy Re 3.7)

21.0 Ha

Amenity open space/ Outdoor playing space.

Amplification

(1) Access to the Town Park will be provided from Smallfield Road with a pedestrian only access from Balcombe Road via footpath 371. Provision in the Town Park should include a cricket square with outfield, 3 football pitches, a well equipped play area, a Multi Use Games Area (MUGA), a youth assault course and a skate ramp, together with a pavilion and parking facilities.
(2) Two areas of land in the NE sector extending to some 0.64 ha and 1.78 ha shall provide for a kickabout area, the latter including an area measuring 0.51 ha for a /NEAP/MUGA.
(3) One area of land in the NW sector extending to 0.76 ha shall provide for a kickabout area and a NEAP/MUGA.
(4) All kickabout areas shall be provided to the same standard of specification as the formal pitch provision to enable them to be fully utilised throughout the year.
(5) The findings of the Leisure Needs Survey and the Facilities Planning Model will be used in the detailed planning of the facilities to be provided on each site.
(6) Buffer zones 4 metres wide should be provided for main rivers (Site 3) and 4 metres wide for other watercourses (Sites 1 and 5) in order to maintain their nature conservation value, prevent pollution and allow access.
(7) Any buildings or landraising should be outside the floodplain envelope.

Land Allocation for Leisure Centre

14.90 Introduction: The critical mass in Horley for the provision of improved facilities has been reached and will be further passed as Horley continues to expand. Also, the Horley Anderson Centre at Court Lodge is nearing the end of its useful life. The Plan therefore seeks to make provision for the future development of an upgraded facility to cater for the increased population of the town.

14.91 A study has been undertaken by the Borough Council to appraise possible locations for a leisure centre to serve Horley, based on a wide range of considerations. Two sites, east of Oakwood School and the former Court Lodge County Secondary School were found to be the most favourable, given the constraints considered which included catchment areas, traffic implications, land ownership, management issues and local character. In light of the scale of development proposed in the North West of the town, the demand this would create and the desire to encourage easy access for as many people as possible by non-vehicular means, the former Court Lodge CSS site is considered to be most favourable. The existing Horley Anderson Centre site was included within the appraisal study but not found to be as favourable as other sites. Its future will have to be considered at the appropriate time, but the existing changing accommodation for the adjacent playing pitches will remain.

14.92 Details of the facility will need careful consideration including the completion of a feasibility study and consideration of timing of provision related to the development of the new residential neighbourhoods and developer contributions to funding.

14.93 Purpose: To identify a site for improved indoor leisure facilities.

Policy Hr 34

A site at the former Court Lodge County Secondary School, Court Lodge Road, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for a leisure centre, including swimming pool, sports hall and associated car parking and changing facilities.

Amplification

(1) Provision of the leisure centre will be dependent on the demolition of the existing school buildings, which are currently used by Adult Education and The Keys Youth Centre. Many of these buildings suffer structural problems and would not be suitable for conversion.
(2) Access to the Leisure Centre is proposed from the eastern side of the site, off Court Lodge Road. Highway improvement measures will be required at the junction of Lee Street and Court Lodge Road and at the existing access to the site. Additional measures will be required to ensure safe access for the increase in traffic along Court Lodge Road.
(3) Provision at the leisure centre will be based upon wet and dry facilities. The exact requirements will be subject to the completion of a feasibility study, but it is expected that the centre will include a swimming pool to replace that at The Horley Anderson Centre, a multi use sports hall, a gym, a dance studio and wet and dry changing facilities.
(4) Alternative accommodation will be required for The Keys Youth Centre and Adult Education use. This should be provided prior to the demolition of the existing buildings in consultation with Surrey County Council and East Surrey College.

Land Allocations for Allotment Provision

14.94 Introduction: Allotments are an important leisure facility, provide a valuable opportunity for gardening and may be the only alternative for those without their own gardens.

14.95 There is currently only one allotment site in Horley, resulting in an existing shortfall compared to the nationally recognised standard of 0.2 ha per 1,000 population. While the demand for allotments varies over time, the Borough Council seeks to protect the existing supply under existing Policy Re 7 and provide new provision when needed. This policy seeks to make provision to meet the demand from the expanding and existing population.

14.96 Purpose: To ensure allotment provision in Horley meets the need of the existing and new population.

Policy Hr 35

The following sites, shown on the Proposals Map, are allocated for allotments:

(i) Land north of Ladbroke Road, Horley (NE Sector) 0.95 Ha
(ii) Land west of Meath Green House, Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector) 1.35 Ha
(iii) Land west of Cheswick Cottage, Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector) 0.41 Ha

Proposals which would prejudice the use of the above sites for allotments will not be permitted.

Any further allotment provision required to meet demand will be expected to be provided in the Riverside Green Chain, close to concentrations of population and where their introduction would not threaten important natural habitats, and avoiding land subject to regular flooding.

Amplification

(1) The sites allocated in the proposed new neighbourhood developments (NE and NW Sectors) are large enough to meet the needs of the allocated housing sites and to contribute to the existing shortfall in provision. It is the intention that this provision can be taken into Borough Council control along with appropriate maintenance funding. However, alternative arrangements may be considered.
(2) Buffer zones should be provided 4 metres wide for watercourses in order to maintain their nature conservation value, prevent pollution and to allow access.

THE RURAL SURROUNDS OF HORLEY

The Rural Surrounds of Horley

14.97 Introduction: Horley is set within a rural area beyond the outer boundary of the Green Belt as described in the Surrey Structure Plan. This area was excluded from the Green Belt to ensure that, if required, future housing development was not precluded from it. Such long term development has now been set out by policies contained within this Plan.

14.98 In order to safeguard the remaining open land beyond the Green Belt, that is not subject to development proposals in this Plan, and to protect its present rural character, there will continue to be a presumption against unacceptable development.

14.99 Purpose: To safeguard the rural area from urban encroachment to protect its present character.

Policy Hr 36

The land, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated as the Rural Surrounds of Horley.

Within this area development will not be permitted unless it is for a use related to the essential needs of agriculture, forestry, outdoor sports and recreation.

Permission will be granted if:

(i) it is reasonably necessary for the host activity;
(ii) there is no harm to the open character of the rural surrounds;
(iii) it is appropriate in scale, design and siting; and
(iv) it does not adversely effect the nature conservation value of the area.

Amplification

(1) The designation of the Rural Surrounds of Horley relates to an important area of land in terms of safeguarding the countryside from encroachment and providing the setting for the urban area. Any development will be expected to be suitable for inclusion within this open rural area.
(2) In considering any proposal, including replacement dwellings and extensions to existing dwellings, in addition to Boroughwide policies, the following policies also apply to this area: Co 2-3, Co 7, and Ho 23-26 inclusive.

Gatwick Airport Open Setting (Former Policy Co 9 unaltered)

14.100 Introduction: Gatwick Airport is unusual among international airports in being set in open surroundings. This adds considerably to its attractiveness. Maintaining this openness has long been an aim of planning policy, through the application of Green Belt policies from when the airport was wholly in Surrey and, since its transfer in 1974, through countryside and strategic gap policies of the West Sussex Structure Plan in respect of that open area to the south. Great care has been taken over the landscaping of the airport itself so as to preserve this open appearance as far as possible and strategic policies in both counties require that other development, whether related to the airport or not, must not be allowed to detract from this. Land to the north-west of the airport in Mole Valley District is now in the Green Belt, and it is therefore considered necessary to provide additional safeguards to the north-east of the airport not included in the Green Belt.

14.101 Purpose: To maintain the open setting of the airport consistent with policies of adjacent local Authorities.

Policy Hr 37

There will be a strong presumption against proposals which would contribute to the coalescence of Horley with Gatwick Airport and result in the loss of the open setting of the airport, as shown on the Proposals Map.

Gatwick Airport Open Setting Areas shown on the Proposals Map:

Gatwick Airport Open Setting - west
Gatwick Airport Open Setting - east

Amplification

(1) Although Gatwick Airport is not a settlement, its boundary as defined in the Crawley Borough Local Plan is regarded as a “policy” built up area for the purposes of the strategic gap policy and other policies in the West Sussex Structure Plan 1993.The rationale of the strategic gap policy is that, if the individual character of a settlement is to be retained, its setting must be given close attention. Much depends on views of it from its approaches or out of it into surrounding countryside. A clear visual break when passing from place to place gives a recognisable structure to a group of settlements. Past decisions about which land should be released for development have usually sought to prevent the coalescence of existing development. The open surroundings of Gatwick Airport include the Crawley-Gatwick Airport/Horley gap.

Riverside Green Chain

14.102 Introduction: Horley’s river and streams almost encircle the town and this plan provides the opportunity for a chain of open space around the town, which is highly accessible to Horley’s residents. Existing rights of way make the circle complete. Much of the ‘chain’ is land liable to flood and as such falls outside the proposed housing sites. Existing Public Open Space from the A23 at Longbridge to Lee Street Sewage Works was covered by the River Mole Open Setting Policy Pc 7,which has been subsumed by this policy. The new areas contain sites of archaeological interest and establishment of the chain will clearly preserve their settings. Discussion with the Environment Agency has highlighted the potential for access and environmental improvements to the river system in Horley. The creation of a cycle and pedestrian route through much of the chain land will ensure that, except at times of flood, it is capable of being used and enjoyed throughout the year.

14.103 Purpose: To identify land around Horley to provide a range of environments for public enjoyment and pastimes, together with an orbital cycle and footpath and, where possible, bridleway route with full public access. Failing that, to secure permissive public access.

Policy Hr 38

The land, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated as the Riverside Green Chain. Within this land all the following uses and facilities will be permitted, where appropriate, in accordance with a more detailed appraisal and land use plan:

(i) informal recreation;
(ii) formal outdoor recreation, allotments, agriculture and woodland where feasible;
(iii) establishment of Local Nature Reserves;
(iv) enhancements to the riverine environment, including the establishment of buffer zones;
(v) safe access to appropriate sections of the riverine environment while protecting other areas as wildlife refuges;
(vi) interpretation of archaeological sites;
(vii) creation of ponds, swales and stormwater wetlands as part of the surface water drainage system serving major new housing development;
(viii) construction of a combined orbital cycle and pedestrian path with connections to new and existing housing areas; and
(ix) provision of facilities for horse riders, where practicable

Amplification

(1) It is the intention that much of the Green Chain can be taken into Borough Council control along with appropriate maintenance funding. Where ownership control is not achievable, the Borough Council will seek to secure permanent public access on a permissive basis in order to maintain the integrity of a circular open space system. Existing residential properties contained within the allocated areas are expected to remain undisturbed.
(2) Agriculture may be possible on certain land, subject to its size, proximity to urban development and the nature of the operation.
(3) For enhancements of the riverine environment, including the establishment of buffer zones, discussions will be necessary with the Environment Agency.
(4) The County Archaeologist and the Borough Council Conservation Officer can advise on appropriate interpretation material.
(5) When sited in the flood plain, surface water drainage features should wherever possible be positioned on land closer to the urban edge rather than close to the river itself.
(6) A combined cycle and pedestrian path should be capable of year round use, except at times of flood, and be designed in accordance with best practice guides published by the County Council and Sustrans.
(7) For facilities for horse riders, discussion will be necessary with British Horse Society representatives, bridleways groups and the County Council Rights of Way Officer.
(8) The Borough Council in consultation with the various developer partnerships will prepare a more detailed appraisal and land use plan for the Riverside Green Chain taking into account the proposals for the respective development sites, land ownership and other relevant considerations.
(9) Interpretation material about Moat Farm will be required at the site together with a footway or pedestrian route alongside the proposed North West Sector access road from the A217 to facilitate a loop from and back to the Riverside Green Chain.
(10) The design of any flood amelioration measures in the Riverside Green Chain should not result in increased flood risk for existing or new residential areas.

EDUCATION FACILITIES

Primary Schools

14.104 Introduction: The development of 2,600 houses would generate about 450 additional primary aged pupils, which is the equivalent of approximately two forms of entry. This will require a reappraisal of education provision in Horley. Although the County Council wishes to retain some flexibility as to how it meets the additional demand over the ten year period of the development, both the County and Borough Councils agree that there are good sustainable transport reasons for securing sites in both the NW and NE Sectors. This will enable the County Council to consider all options, which may include the relocation of existing provision, and to allow for the longer term flexibility in primary provision in Horley appropriate to local circumstances.

14.105 Purpose: To allocate primary school sites to accompany the new neighbourhoods.

Policy Hr 39

The following sites, shown on the Proposals Map, are allocated for Primary Schools

1. Land at Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector), 1.20 Ha
2. Land at Langshott/Lake Lane, Horley (NE Sector), 1.22 Ha

Amplification

(1) The County Council will bring forward proposals, at the appropriate time, for the provision of additional facilities to meet the pupil demand generated by housing development in Horley. The Borough Council considers that this provision should be made in the early stages of the development, both in the interests of community development and for sustainable transport reasons. Secondary School Extension at Oakwood School

14.106 Introduction: The development of 2600 houses would generate about 320 additional secondary aged pupils (11-16). The existing Oakwood School is the only option to provide places in Horley and extensions to the existing facilities would be required.

14.107 Purpose: To identify Oakwood School as the site for extra secondary school provision.

Policy Hr 40

Land at Oakwood School, Balcombe Road, Horley, as shown on the Proposals Map, is allocated for the expansion of secondary school provision.

Amplification

(1) The County Council will bring forward proposals, at the appropriate time, for additional facilities at Oakwood School, to meet the additional demand for secondary school places from housing development in Horley.

COMMUNITY FACILITIES

Neighbourhood Centres

14.108 Introduction: The Borough Council recognises that community facilities play an important part in the lives of residents of the Borough and wish to see provision made to meet the requirements of the expanded population of Horley. Such facilities need to be appropriately sited so as to be accessible by a range of modes of transport. A range of facilities is sought to increase the attractiveness of the centres to users and to promote the combining of journeys, for example, to the schools and local shops.

14.109 Purpose: To identify where multi-purpose community halls will be provided along with local shops etc in the two proposed neighbourhoods to meet the community needs of the new population in a sustainable manner.

Policy Hr 41

The following sites, as shown on the Proposals Map, are allocated for multi-function community halls, local shops and services and associated land:

(i) Land at Meath Green Lane, Horley (NW Sector), 1.71 Ha
(ii) Land at Langshott/Lake Lane, Horley (NE Sector), 0.34 Ha

Amplification

(1) Within each neighbourhood centres provision should be made for a range of local facilities. Appropriate facilities would include local convenience stores including a newsagents, general store (with post office provision), public house/restaurant, take-away food facility. Flats may usefully be sited over such commercial uses.
(2) The community hall within each neighbourhood should provide a main hall suitable, in height and area, to contain a minimum of one badminton court, whilst also serving as a large meeting room. A range of other smaller rooms should be provided for meetings, at least one of which should be suitable for subdivision for small meetings. One of these rooms should be capable of making provision for a doctor, nurse or health visitor seeing patients, (in the NW sector this could be provided for in the doctors’ surgery). Provision should be made within the halls for kitchen facilities.
(3) Provision in the NW neighbourhood shall include a site for a doctors surgery accommodating three doctors and their supporting staff, a dental practice and pharmacy. In the short-term, it may be possible for accommodation to be provided within the community hall. Provision for nurse accommodation and health visitors could, in the long term, be made in the doctors’ surgery rather than the community hall.
(4) A place for religious worship should be provided within one or both of the neighbourhood centres. This could be provided within the community halls or as a separate building.
(5) Consideration should be given to providing parking within the neighbourhood centres on a shared basis, catering for the schools, shops, community hall and other services. Reduced parking requirements will be considered where facilities are shared and other transport links established.

Healthy Living Centre

14.110 Policy Hr 42 deleted in favour of Policy Hr 42A.

Library and Community Information Centre

14.111 Introduction: An earlier proposal for a healthy living centre included a library and facilities for adult education. Unfortunately, although progress has been made with a healthy living programme, the requirements and prospects for a suitable specialist healthy living centre building have been abandoned for the foreseeable future.

14.112 The County Council now wishes to progress a new scheme for a modern and flexible community information centre. This is intended to incorporate a new enlarged library and information centre and a new and improved local office to accommodate Surrey County Council support staff serving the Horley Area, in one building. Additional office space could also be made available for other uses. The provision of a café/coffee shop as part of this scheme would also enhance its attractiveness and use.

14.113 The County Council is also looking to accommodate a town centre drop-in facility suitable for the Youth Service, either through conversion of an existing building or a vacant shop, or in a new purpose built building, as part of the library and community information centre.

14.114 The Borough Council is working in partnership with the County Council to identify a suitable and appropriate site for the new centre.

14.115 Purpose: To facilitate the provision of a modern and flexible community information centre, including a library, information centre, local offices to accommodate Surrey County Council and a drop-in facility for the Youth Service.

Policy Hr 42A

A new Library and Community Information Centre will be developed in Horley Town Centre provided that the following criteria are met:

(i) the development has excellent accessibility both into the building and to the building from all modes of travel; and
(ii) enabling private sector uses will be permitted if these form an integral part of the comprehensive package.

Amplification

(1) A town centre location is considered likely to best meet the general needs of a library and community information centre, which is accessible to all.
(2) Enabling private sector uses could contribute both towards the financial viability of the scheme and towards providing a non-threatening family environment. Such uses might include shops, a café, offices and crèche.

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